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Difference Between Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B

Hepatitis A vs Hepatitis B

Hepatitis A is caused by the hepatitis A virus or HAV. HAV can be found in the feces of a contaminated person. This virus may endure in saltwater, freshwater, and cold environments. An individual may contract HAV by consuming raw seafood from contaminated water sources with human feces or ingesting infected water. This virus can also be acquired by having direct contact with a contaminated person or sharing drinks, food, or even eating paraphernalia with him. It can as well be acquired through having poor hygiene, by not washing hands carefully after utilizing the toilet, changing the diapers of an infected infant, or prior to preparing food.

HAV originates from an acute source but is commonly not a long-term disease. In approximately all instances, if the immune system of a person is strong and healthy, the body eradicates the virus within the body in around week or a few months. There is no particular standard management aside from adequate nutrition and rest. Keeping the immune system of your body strong is also important. Alcohol is a drug that stresses the liver, such as acetaminophen, and must be averted until the physician determines that the liver is entirely healed. An individual who has this virus will possibly be resistant from it but may have other forms of hepatitis infection. Vaccination may prevent this virus from invading the body.

On the other hand, Hepatitis B is caused by the hepatitis B virus or HBV. It kills more than 500,000 people every year, similar to malaria. More than two billion persons or approximately one-third of the population of the word have been contaminated with the hepatitis B virus. The majority of patients recover after a few months. The disease may become a long-term condition for a few people. For the entire period of your life, whether you have manifestations or not, you will have the possibility to infect other persons as well.

Hepatitis B virus is present within the bloodstream, semen, and vaginal secretions of infected individuals. The virus is transmitted when these secretions go into the body of a person who does not have a strong immune system. This type of virus may be spread through transplacental involvement or from a contaminated mother to her infant, as well as on dental, medical, body-piercing, or tattooing paraphernalia that have not been appropriately sterilized. Sharing of razors, nail clippers, needles, toothbrushes, or anything that may be transferring even a small quantity of blood through a break in the integumentary system may transmit the virus too. Unprotected sexual intercourse may spread the disease.

Healthcare professionals perceive that this virus is not transmitted through insect bites, by holding the hands of an infected patient, by coughing, hugging, kissing, breastfeeding, and sharing eating paraphernalia. The majority of adults recover from an acute infection of the virus and may then be immune from it. Younger children are at a higher risk than others in developing a long-term condition. Unmanaged cases, long-term hepatitis B infections may lead to liver malfunction or even death. Vaccination may avert the occurrence of hepatitis B.

Summary:

1.Hepatitis A is caused by the hepatitis A virus or HAV. On the other hand, hepatitis B is caused by the hepatitis B virus or HBV.

2.HAV can be found in the feces of a contaminated person. Hepatitis B virus is present within the bloodstream, semen, and vaginal secretions of infected individuals.

3.An individual may contract HAV by consuming raw seafood from contaminated water sources with human feces or ingesting infected water. The HBV is transmitted when these secretions go into the body of a person who does not have a strong immune system.

4.Vaccination may prevent HAV from invading the body. Vaccination may avert the occurrence of hepatitis B.

5.Alcohol is a drug that stresses the liver, such as acetaminophen, and must be avoided until the physician determines that the liver is entirely healed. Unmanaged cases, long-term hepatitis B infections may lead to liver malfunction or even death.


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