Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Differences Between Tahitian And South Sea Pearls

Tahitian And South Sea Pearls

Both Tahitian pearls and South Sea pearls are great additions to any jewelry box. They are indeed a symbol of unique, rare, and expensive jewelries. They do vary in different aspects. Although some people might think they all look the same, their variations actually make a great significance in their natural treasure. Therefore, it is essential for you to identify both of them. Because pearls are also a means of deception nowadays, you might be fooled in buying one instead of the other or buying a fake one.

The Origins of the Pearls

Tahitian pearls come from the coasts of Tahiti. Sometimes these pearls can be found in French Polynesia, too. Pinctada margatifera are the only oyster species that creates Tahitian pearls. These pearl oysters are said to have had contributed over 90 million euros to the pearl manufacturers. Mostly, males are found in the seas; the females are lacking. Thus, researchers are still currently looking for scientific ways on how to improve Tahitian pearls without compromising the quality.

On the other hand, South Sea pearls can be found in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Pinctada maxima pearl oysters, specifically gold-lipped and silver-lipped oysters, are what generate and create these pearls. These oysters are said to be excellent in protecting the pearls from the natural intrusions of the seas. As with the Tahitian pearls, the pearl manufacturers are still looking for ways to perfect the pearl at its natural birth, since only a few of these pearls come out in naturally round shape.

Featuring the Differences of Both Pearls

South Sea pearls are naturally delicate pastel in hue and color. They range from being soft white to creamy champagne and pink. Tahitian peals, on the different side of the spectrum, are bold and dramatic, since the natural color is black. Tahitians are very rare. South Sea pearls are much easier to find. Other differences between these two pearls are their sizes and nacre thickness. South Sea pearls are almost 15 mm in size, bigger than the usual 13 mm of those Tahitian pearls. The nacre thickness of South Sea pearls range from 2 to 6 mm, while the Tahitian pearls are just 2 to 3 mm.

Pearls can be worn with pride, especially when you know that there really is a great difference in the cost of each of them. Hence, when looking for a pearl, it is a wise decision to search for pearl manufacturers that are reputable. Pearls can easily be imitated. This is the reason why many people use pearls to make their customers pay high prices when in fact they gave them fake pearls. When this happens, you can go to a pawnshop or any other jewelry stores near you and ask about the authenticity of the pearls. Many imitation ones can truly pull off a great look and can fool anyone, especially those who are not very knowledgeable about pearls.

Summary:

Tahitian pearls come from the coasts of Tahiti. Sometimes these pearls can be found in French Polynesia, too. On the other hand, South Sea pearls can be found in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Pinctada margatifera are the only oysters that create Tahitian pearls. Pinctada maxima pearl oysters, specifically gold-lipped and silver-lipped oysters, are what generate and create South Sea pearls.

South Sea pearls are naturally delicate pastel in hue and color. They range from being soft white to creamy champagne and pink. Tahitian pearls, on the different side of the spectrum, are bold and dramatic, since the natural color is black.


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