Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Differences Between Proffer and Offer

Proffer vs Offer

Though there are several words with the same meaning, each word is correctly used in a certain degree. Like the words “proffer” and “offer,” they have both similar meanings. However, there are some instances for which word is preferred to use.

According to vocabulary.com, “proffer” means “presenting something for either acceptance or rejection.” And according to merriam-webster.com, “offer” means “to present for acceptance or rejection,” too. Undoubtedly, these two words have the same meaning.

The only debate that comes for the usage of “proffer” and “offer” is that the former is more formal to use than the latter. The word “proffer” is also more polite to use. Here are some example sentences from the web:

a      Proffer relevant advice to the client. – This statement used the word “proffer” as presenting some applicable options or solutions to that particular client. Is the word proffer formally used? Well, it is. The statement is obviously showing that the matter is business-related since there is a client. Is the word “proffer” politely used? It is, since the statement is dealing with a client.

b      Not surprisingly, the deputy judge did not proffer such advice. – This statement used the word “proffer” as being unable to present pieces of advice coming from the subject, the deputy judge. Is the word “proffer” formally used? It is, since the word “proffer” is being related to court-related matters. Is the word “proffer” politely used? It is, since the statement is carefully constructed to fit court-related matters.

c      The initial magazine articles that named the new symptoms also proffered their probable cause. – This statement used the word “proffer” as giving the reasons why the symptoms of a particular sickness occurred. Is the word “proffer” formally used? It is, since the statement is particularly involved with health. Is the word “proffer” politely used? It is, since the statement is politely stating the probable cause of the new symptoms.

Can you replace the word “proffer” with “offer” in the above examples? Let us take a look.

a      Offer relevant advice to the client. – The word “proffer” can be replaced with the word “offer.” However, it sounds more like a command to give relevant advice to the client. Though there’s nothing wrong with it, “offer” can still be used. You can use the word “offer” here if you are telling this to your younger subordinate.

b      Not surprisingly, the deputy judge did not offer such advice. – The word “proffer” can be replaced with the word “offer.” Does it sound impolite and informal? No, it doesn’t. Actually, you can replace the word “proffer” with “offer” as long as it doesn’t sound awkward.

c      The initial magazine articles that named the new symptoms also offered their probable cause. – The word “proffer” can be replaced with the word “offer.” Does it sound impolite and informal? No, it doesn’t. However, it sounds a little awkward. It seems that the one who names the new symptoms was very openly giving the probable cause. If you use the word “proffer,” the statement sounds better.

When using the words “proffer” and “offer,” think first of the situation. Does the situation permit you to sound too formal and too polite? For example: “I proffered her a hand.” It is grammatically correct, but do you use that statement these days? It is much better to say, “I offered her a hand.” It is just like using the word “thy” versus “your.” We hear the word “thy” in prayers, but in actual meaning, it only means “your.”

Summary:

1      “Proffer” and “offer” have the same meaning of “to present something that can be accepted or rejected.”

2      The word “proffer” is more formal and more polite to use than “offer.”

 

 


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