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Difference Between Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars

Keloid vs Hypertrophic Scars

As soon as an accident occurs to any part of the body, it has a normal means of performing the repair of any type of open wound. The proliferation of fibroblasts and skin cells are the initial stride in the groundwork of the healing process. A cluster of fibroblasts can create a system wherein the cells of the skin can close and settle the open wound.

Usually both skin cells and fibroblasts are created at the same speed, and the outcome is regular scar tissue that fades away over time. Nevertheless, if a fibroblast replicates more rapidly than the cells of the skin, they will create a thick binder that occludes the resettlement of the new skin cells to the injured site. This abnormality produces an elevated scar tissue commonly known as a hypertrophic scar or a keloid. But what is the disparity between these types of scars?

Keloid scars are forms of scars that are created beyond the portion of the original lesion or cut. They are an itchy and puckered group of scar tissue that rises over the other skin surface. These elevated scars are abnormal in shape and not like any typical form of scars. They frequently get large and worse as time passes by. They may range in color from pink to cherry red and frequently develop slowly forming an ugly, huge scar. They can as well be receptive to touch, scratchy, and sometimes painful. In terms of a histological perspective, this type of scar is composed of substantial and copious collagen clusters which create lumps deep inside the scar.

A hypertrophic scar originates from the overproduction of collagen substances inside the body. The excessive creation of collagen substances can lead to an elevated scar akin to a keloid scar. Nevertheless, a hypertrophic scar does not develop beyond the restrictions of the original lesion unlike a keloid does.

Hypertrophic and keloid scars grow as an outcome of a proliferation of the dermal tissues subsequent to any form of skin injury and are typical. Keloids can grow in 5 to 15 per cent of wounds. Topical sheeting silicone gel is a slightly adherent, semi-impeding, soft covering which is made from medical standard silicone polymers. This type of silicone gel is utilized to lessen the dimensions and augment the elastic properties of a keloid and hypertrophic scar, as a dressing for the recipient and the donor sites during skin grafting surgeries, and as a management for burn injuries.

Probable indiscriminately controlled clinical experiments of silicone products in the management of hypertrophic and keloid scars are restricted, and the results of these experiments have not consistently shown a clinically momentous advantage for silicone products in managing keloid and hypertrophic scars over regular wound dressings.

Hypertrophic scars are much easier to treat than keloid scars. They can be treated easily because they have less tissue volume than keloid scars. Keloid formations are sometimes genetically acquired while hypertrophic scars are just acquired through any cases of abnormality during the healing process. It is necessary to treat keloid scars before they grow to be a larger form.

Summary:

1.An elevated scar tissue is commonly known as a hypertrophic scar or a keloid.

2.Keloid scars are forms of scars that are created beyond the portion of the original lesion or cut. Nevertheless, a hypertrophic scar does not develop beyond the restrictions of the original lesion unlike a keloid scar.

3.A hypertrophic scar originates from the overproduction of collagen substances inside the body. The excessive creation of collagen substances can lead to an elevated scar akin to a keloid scar.

4.Hypertrophic scars are much easier to treat than keloid scars.

5.Keloid formations are sometimes genetically acquired while hypertrophic scars are just acquired through any cases of abnormality during the healing process.


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