Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Mood and Emotion

Mood vs Emotion

Mood and emotion are words that are used interchangeably. Both emotion and mood are related to each other that makes the distinction a bit hard.

One of the main differences between mood and emotion can be seen in the expression. Mood is something a person may not express whereas emotions may be expressed. Another difference is that moods may last longer than the emotions.

Emotions are aroused in people by some specific objects or situations. On the other hand, moods are not created in someone because of any specific object or any particular situation. For example, if a person gets angry, he expresses that emotion towards someone. If a person is in a sad mood, he cannot express it to others. The concept that emotion is object- based has been proven even during Aristotle’s times. The object- directed distinction has always been a criterion to differentiate between moods and emotions.

Mood may for a long period whereas emotions only last for the time being. An anger or happiness pertains to the time it is felt. On the other hand, sadness or any other mood is something that can be felt for many days.

When compared to moods, emotions are more extreme.

Emotion is a word that has been derived from the French emouvoir. This word is based on the Latin word emovere, which means ‘out’ and movere which means ‘move’. Mood is a word that is derived from the Old English word of Mod, which represented military courage. This word also referred to personal courage at some particular time.

Summary

1. Mood is something a person may not express whereas emotions may be expressed.

2. Mood may last for a long period whereas emotions may last only for the time being.

3. Emotions are aroused in people by some specific objects or situations. On the other hand, moods are not created in someone because of any specific object or any particular situation.

4. If a person gets angry, he expresses that emotion towards someone. If a person is in a sad mood, he cannot express it to others.

5. When compared to moods, emotions are more extreme.

6. Emotion is a word that has been derived from the French emouvoir.

7. Mood is a word that is derived from the Old English word of Mod, which represented military courage.


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2 Comments

  1. Thanks alot for such information.

    I need this for my exam preparation

  2. I am not sure I agree with you about one not having the capacity to express mood to another person.

    Take for example the implication of this statement: “Both loneliness and social networks have been linked with mood and wellbeing,” which was taken from the abstract objective of “Loneliness, social support networks, mood and wellbeing in community-dwelling elderly,” by Golden J, Conroy RM, Bruce I, Denihan A, Greene E, and Kirby M, Lawlor, BA, as published in the Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;24(7):694-700. doi: 10.1002/gps.2181.

    These various professionals have garnered moods from community-dwelling elderly, who must have expressed themselves in a manner that proves a capacity to do so.

    But, let me say that as a poet, it has been said about my latest book Blue Emptiness that, “When the narrator describes his loneliness, the reader truly feels it.”

    So, I would disagree with you on this point.

    And I don’t agree with you about the differential of extremity between moods and emotions. The longevity, for example, of a moody, bi-polar person can wreak havoc probably because they are emotional and moody, where an emotional person can set off similar feelings.

    Anyway, at this point, I think you were correct at the outset to say that: “Mood and emotion are words that are used interchangeably…” I can’t separate them unless I go to the dictionary and that doesn’t seem fair.

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