Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Robbery and Larceny

Robbery vs Larceny

Robbery and larceny are both theft but used in different circumstances. While robbery is theft or taking or attempting to steal some valuable things from another by threats, intimidation, and force. Larceny is taking away something valuable from another person without his knowledge, without any threats, intimidation, or force.

In robbery, the person who is robbed is aware that he is losing his valuable things. In a robbery, the person who is victimized should be present. If they are not, it is not considered robbery. But in the case of larceny, the person who is robbed is unaware that his valuables have been stolen.

While robbery is committed in front of the victim, it is not so with larceny. In robbery, as said earlier, the victim is threatened or forced to give away his valuables at gunpoint or any other means.
Mugging, bank robbery, piracy and looting are some of the examples of robbery. Extortion is also considered robbery as it involves threatening to do something if a victim does not fulfil the demands. Vehicle theft, shoplifting, and pickpocketing are examples of larceny.

If a person picks your wallet, then it is larceny. But if a mugger knocks you down and picks the pocket, it is robbery as some force is involved in it. This means that even if a small force is involved, then it is robbery.

Larceny is simply stealing. It comes in two types: grand larceny (stealing valuable things in excess of $100 or whatever cut-off amount may be in the jurisdiction) and petty larceny (stealing petty things whose value is below a statutorily set amount e.g. $100).

Summary:

1.Robbery is theft or taking or attempting to steal some valuable things from another by threat, intimidation and force. 2.Larceny is taking away something valuable from another person without his knowledge, without any threat, intimidation, or force.
3.In robbery, the person who is victimized should be present. If they are not, it is not considered robbery. But in the case of larceny, the person who is robbed is unaware that his valuables have been stolen.
4.Mugging, bank robbery, piracy, extortion, and looting are some of the examples of robbery.
5.Vehicle theft, shoplifting, and pickpocketing are examples of larceny.
6.If a person picks your wallet, then it is larceny. But if a mugger knocks you down and picks the pocket, it is robbery as some force is involved in it.
7.Larceny is simply stealing. It comes in two types: grand larceny (stealing valuable things in excess of $100 or 8.whatever cut-off amount may be int eh jurisdiction) and petty larceny (stealing petty things whose value is below a statutorily set amount e.g. $100).


Search DifferenceBetween.net :

Custom Search



Help us improve. Rate this post! 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars
Loading ... Loading ...


Email This Post Email This Post : If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.



See more about :

1 Comment

  1. Actually, there is more dimensions to the difference between larceny and theft than just whether or not the person knew that it was happening. More often than not, larceny is committed through some kind of trickery, which would involve the victim knowing that something was going on. Larceny is defined as the unlawful taking of something of value that belongs to another, with the intention of permanently depriving them of that value and property. Sounds like theft, does it not?

    The terms are actually quite interchangeable. In some jurisdictions it becomes larceny when trickery is involved, like pretending to be some type of authority figure, and confiscating supposed evidence. Or, by promising to deliver a service in exchange for goods or money, and never delivering. The act of selling an item stolen from someone else to an unsuspecting party is also considered larceny. Larceny

Leave a Response

Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.


Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Finder