Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Mutex and Event

Mutex vs Event

In C#, there are a lot of different threading synchronization options. The two more widely used are mutex and event. Just what exactly is the difference between these two? Which one is a better option?

The event option is able to give threads the option to block up until an event is broadcast thus the name “event.” It is the same as putting something to sleep and only waking it up when something of significance happens. Events are unlike mutexes because mutexes do not have the signaling option or function. Events are able to clear the signal once someone who was able to wait on it has been woken up. Even API’s are able to allow the option to block up until one or all of the different events are signaled. In addition, events are kernel objects. They are not “lighter” compared to mutexes. An event is basically a kernel object having two states. Normally, an event signals the coming of an event and sometimes even the end of an I/O operation.

“Mutex” stands for Mutual Exclusion. It is a form of scoped coordination mechanism for resources that are shared. Think of it as a form of transaction. You are not obliged to wait although you want to access a few shared resources (only in the instance that others are already accessing it) you are blocking. A mutex consists of two states although it exists to put into effect a mutual exclusion. This is for when you want to protect a stretch of code which usually updates a shared resource from the part in which the mutex is claimed to the part in which it will be released. This leads to the fact that no other thread can pass through the section.

People who have tried to simulate an event with the help of a mutex had to encounter the problem wherein as soon as the lock is acquired or the event was signaled, the person is keeping everyone else out up until the lock is released. This is not the semantics of an event being signaled. An event may remain posted and a form of gate will be available for all the thread testing in the event not having any locks. Mutex committed to interprocess synchronization is in kernel-mode object. Events made for multithreaded synchronization under one method are in user-mode object.

Mutex object is too heavy and too general. Event objects are much lighter. User-mode synchronization is used in most situations due to the reason that it gives less CPU cycles. Mutex is very much like a critical section and is used to synchronize access to resources that are shared. Events have a totally different function because they are used to synchronize tasks or for management of task scheduling for some people.

Events are more of a condition variable, unlike Mutex, which is more like a
monitor in some of the terminology, or it can be a traditional form of semaphore/mutex.

Summary:

1.The event option is able to give threads the option to block up until an event is broadcast, thus the name “event.”

2.An event is basically a kernel object having two states. Normally, an event signals the coming of an event and sometimes even the end of an I/O operation.

3.“Mutex” stands for Mutual Exclusion. It is a form of scoped coordination mechanism for resources that are shared.

4.Mutex committed to interprocess synchronization is in kernel-mode object. Events made for multithreaded synchronization under one method are in user-mode object.

5.Events are more of a condition variable, unlike the Mutex, which is more like a
monitor in some of the terminology, or it can be a traditional form of semaphore/mutex.


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