Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Deaf vs Hard of Hearing

It is not easy to differentiate between “deaf” and “hard of hearing.” The deaf and hard of hearing community is very diverse.

Medically, the definition of “deaf” and “hard of hearing” depends upon the decibels of hearing loss a person is suffering from. There are different degrees of hearing loss, and it is considered that the loss which is less than profound is termed “hard of hearing.” When we say “degree of hearing loss,” it refers to the level of severity of the hearing loss. The hearing loss range is denoted in decibels, dB HL. Let us refer to the following for a better understanding of the different terms that are associated with hearing loss and deafness:

Degree of hearing loss is considered normal when the hearing loss range is 10 to 15dB HL.
Degree of hearing loss is considered slight when the hearing loss range is 16 to 25.
Degree of hearing loss is considered mild if the hearing loss range is 26 to 40.
Degree of hearing loss is considered moderate when the hearing loss range is 41 to 55.
Degree of hearing loss is considered moderately severe when the hearing loss range is 56 to 70.
Degree of hearing loss is considered severe when the hearing loss range is 71 to 90.
Degree of hearing loss is considered profound when the hearing loss range is 91+.

As per this information, one can say that medically one is considered hard of hearing when the hearing loss range is less than profound or less than 91 dB HL. People in general language and in general terms refer to all the people with a hearing impairment as deaf which is not correct. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) “deaf” people are unable to process language and speech by relying on their hearing as they cannot hear their own voice or any other voice. Whereas people with moderate or mild hearing loss may process language and speech and also communicate with other individuals using their hearing capabilities because they can hear sounds but may not be able to distinguish the speech pattern to assist them in conversation.
When hearing loss occurs in both the ears it is called “bilateral” whereas hearing loss in one ear is referred to as “unilateral.”
Other than the medical definition, there are other definitions which are used for differentiating between deaf and hard of hearing like “functional.” This definition refers to the fact that deaf people cannot hear even with hearing aids, and some people who considered themselves deaf can function well with hearing aids. In “Deaf Culture,” the words are always capitalized.

Summary:

1.Medically, the definition of “deaf” and “hard of hearing” depends upon the decibels of hearing loss a person is suffering from. There are different degrees of hearing loss, and it is considered that loss which is less than profound is “hard of hearing.”
2.According to the CDC, “deaf” people are unable to process language and speech by relying on their hearing as they cannot hear their own voice or any other voice. Whereas, people who are “hard of hearing” may process language and speech and also communicate with other individuals using their hearing capabilities because they can hear sounds.


Search DifferenceBetween.net :

Custom Search


Help us improve. Rate this post! 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars
Loading...

Email This Post Email This Post : If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.


Leave a Response

Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.


See more about :
Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Finder