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Difference Between 5G and 4G

Ever since the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) triggered an unprecedented change in the way people communicate with each other, mobile communication has become an everyday commodity. In a very few years, it has evolved from being a technology of a few privileged to today’s ubiquitous systems used by majority of the world’s population. Over the past four decades, the world has witnessed four generations of mobile communications, each with a specific set of technologies. The first generation system was based on analog transmission and limited to voice services only. The second generation of mobile communications emerged in the early 1990s, which saw the introduction of digital transmission on the radio link and witnessed the success of GSM. Then came the 3G and the world entered into a new digital era with a truly unique mobile-broadband experience.

We are currently in the fourth generation of mobile communications, represented by the advanced LTE technology following in the steps of HSPA, providing higher efficiency and enhanced mobile-broadband experience. This is provided by means of OFDM-based transmission which enables wider-transmission bandwidths and more advanced multi-antenna technologies. Now, the industry is already on the road towards the fifth generation of mobile communications, commonly referred to as 5G, which is going to be very different from previous mobile network generations. With 5G, we are ushering towards the next generation of mobile broadband experience. Let’s see how is 5G is different from 4G.

 

What is 4G?

4G refers to the fourth generation mobile communications system, represented by the LTE technology, providing higher efficiency and enhanced mobile-broadband experience. The demand for new services and for higher peak bit rates and data capacity led to the evolution of 4G. This is provided by means of OFDM-based transmission which enables wider-transmission bandwidths and more advanced multi-antenna technologies. One of the main reasons to use OFDM is to increase the robustness against frequency selective fading and narrowband interference. The same bands that were originally defined for IMT-2000 and use for 3G deployment are also being used for 4G, including LTE-Advanced deployment.

 

What is 5G?

The world is all set to embrace the next generation of mobile communications system, commonly referred to as fifth generation, or 5G. The discussions of 5G mobile communications system began around 2012 and in those discussions, the term 5G is often used to refer to specific new 5G radio-access technology. However, 5G is often used in a much wider context; it is regarded as a platform that will enable wireless connectivity to all kinds of services, existing as well as yet-to-be-known services, taking wireless networks beyond mobile broadband. 5G systems are expected to provide an enhanced mobile broadband targeting peak data rate of 20 Gbps, enabling mission-critical applications that require ultra-high reliability and low latency.

 

Difference Between 5G and 4G

  1. Basics of 5G and 4G

– 4G refers to the fourth generation mobile communications system, represented by the LTE technology, providing higher efficiency and enhanced mobile-broadband experience. It supersedes the third generation (3G) and second generation (2G) mobile technology. The upcoming next generation of mobile communications system, commonly referred to as fifth generation, or 5G, which succeeds the existing 4G, 3G, and 2G standards, remains in its development stage and is all set to begin its offerings soon. It is going to be very different from the existing 4G mobile technology.

  1. Technology in 5G and 4G

– 5G is more than just one thing, not just referring to a specific radio-access technology but rather to a wide range of new services envisioned to be enabled by future mobile communication. It is the next phase of mobile communications technology beyond the current LTE-Advanced. The fourth generation (4G) of mobile communications system, represented by the advanced LTE technology, follows in the steps of HSPA, providing higher efficiency and enhanced mobile-broadband experience. This is provided by means of OFDM-based transmission which enables wider-transmission bandwidths and more advanced multi-antenna technologies.

  1. Latency 

– 5G corresponds to the future generation of mobile communications standard, enabling larger data volumes and enhanced user experience by supporting higher end-user data rates. And one of the most important attributes of the 5G network technology is low latency making it suitable for new latency-critical wireless applications, enabling a true mobile broadband experience. The latency of 4G, on the other hand, varies from carrier to carrier and device to device. With extremely low latency capabilities, 5G will stay ahead of 4G.

  1. Performance of 5G and 4G

 – On the performance metrics, 5G is approximately 20 times faster than 4G in terms of peak speed meaning you can download more things in less time. Additionally, 5G operate at extremely high frequencies in the 30 GHz to 300 GHz range, whereas the current 4G networks use frequency bands below 6 GHz. This accounts for massive speed increases, offering a minimum peak download speed of 20 Gbps, while the current 4G networks poke along at only 1 Gbps. Plus 5G can support up to an additional 1000 connected devices per meter.

5G vs. 4G: Comparison Chart

 

 

Summary of 5G vs 4G

In a nutshell, 5G corresponds to the future generation of mobile communications standard, enabling larger data volumes and enhanced user experience by supporting higher end-user data rates. Additionally, 5G operate at extremely high frequencies in the 30 GHz to 300 GHz range, which accounts for massive speed increases and improved bandwidth and capacity of mobile broadband. With extremely low latency capabilities, 5G will make for new latency-critical wireless applications such as wireless connectivity for traffic safety. Well, 5G isn’t here yet, preparing to be deployed soon.

 

Sagar Khillar

Sagar Khillar is a prolific content/article/blog writer working as a Senior Content Developer/Writer in a reputed client services firm based in India. He has that urge to research on versatile topics and develop high-quality content to make it the best read. Thanks to his passion for writing, he has over 7 years of professional experience in writing and editing services across a wide variety of print and electronic platforms.

Outside his professional life, Sagar loves to connect with people from different cultures and origin. You can say he is curious by nature. He believes everyone is a learning experience and it brings a certain excitement, kind of a curiosity to keep going. It may feel silly at first, but it loosens you up after a while and makes it easier for you to start conversations with total strangers – that’s what he said."

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1 Comment

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References :


[0]Image credit: https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1444337

[1]Image credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:5G_mobile_network_diagram.jpg

[2]Dahlman, Erik, et al. 4G, LTE-Advanced Pro and The Road to 5G. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Academic Press, 2016. Print

[3]Asif, Saad. 5G Mobile Communications: Concepts and Technologies. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 2018. Print

[4]Dahlman, Erik, et al. 4G: LTE/LTE-Advanced for Mobile Broadband. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Academic Press, 2013. Print

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