Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Permanent Residency and Citizenship

Well, it might sound simple but there are many people who still aren’t so sure if a permanent resident status is the same as the citizenship or not. Then there are Green card holders who are lawfully authorized to live and work in the United States permanently. But technically Green card holders are the same as lawful permanent residents (or LPRs). Let’s take a look at some key differences between the two.

Permanent Residency

A permanent residency status refers to anyone who has been granted the right to live and work in the United States indefinitely. Lawful permanent residents of the US are issued what’s known as a “Green card,” which is like a legal proof of identity. Having this status means you are allowed to live and work permanent in the country. It gives you official immigration status in the US and entitles you to certain rights and responsibilities.

Citizenship

Citizenship means you are a citizen of the country and you legally belong here. It is the highest immigration status available in the US and comes with many perks. You are a citizen of the US if you were born anywhere in the US or its territories including Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands. Basically all persons born or naturalized in the US are the citizens of the US.

Difference between Permanent Residency and Citizenship

Status

– The permanent residency status means you are allowed to live and work permanent in the country. It gives you official immigration status in the US and entitles you to certain rights and responsibilities. Citizenship, on the other hand, is the highest immigration status available in the US which means you were either born anywhere in the US or within its territories such as Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands. In Order to become a US citizen, you first need to have a Green card for at least three or five years; three years if you received your green card through a US citizen spouse and five years if you got your green card in any other way.

Benefits/Restrictions

– Well, a permanent resident is a lot like a citizen of the United States, but there are a lot of things that a permanent resident is not entitled to. Citizenship can get you an American passport, gives you the right to vote, and you could potentially sponsor your parents. A permanent resident can’t vote and serve on a jury, and cannot work certain government jobs. Permanent residents can sponsor their family members to come to the US, but they will be considered “preference relatives.” But only a selected people are issued immigrant visas per year, so you’re probably going on a waiting list for a long time.

Permanent Residency vs. Citizenship: Comparison Chart

Summary

So in a nutshell, permanent residency is like a bridge step because you cannot go directly from a non-citizen to a citizen of the United States. You have to be a permanent resident first. So, it’s mostly the same; you can live here on the permanent basic, work here indefinitely, and you can travel, but are not entitled all the benefits of a citizenship. As a permanent resident, you can’t vote, you can’t serve on a jury, and cannot work certain government jobs. And a permanent resident has to keep his/her home country’s citizenship and passport.

Do permanent residents have the same rights as citizens?

While permanent residents can enjoy most of the same benefits as a citizen, they are not US citizens so they do not have all the rights as citizens of the US.

Is Canadian PR and citizenship same?

A permanent resident is someone who enjoys the permanent resident status by immigrating to Canada, but is not entitled to all the rights of a citizen.

Can you lose U.S. citizenship?

You might lose your US citizenship status in specific cases like if you enter military service or run for a public office in a foreign country.

Do Permanent residents get passports?

Permanent residents are not issued a US passport. They are issued what is called an Alien Registration Card (ARC) by the USCIS for identity.

Does permanent residency expire?

Although some permanent resident cards have no expiration date on them, most of them are valid for 10 years. The re-entry permit is valid for 2 years from the date of issue.

How many years does it take to get Canadian citizenship?

To get a Canadian citizenship you need to have lived in Canada for at least 3 years out of the last 5 years before you sign your application.

What can permanent residents do?

As a permanent resident, you can live and work in the United States indefinitely, just like a citizen of the States. Only an immigration judge has the right to remove from the PR status.

Can I travel internationally with a Permanent Resident Card?

You can travel outside the US with your Permanent resident card but you must present the valid alien registration card upon re-entry into the US.

What are the benefits of Canadian citizenship?

Becoming a citizen of Canada opens many doors; you get more job opportunities, you can vote and run for political office, and so on.

How long after getting PR can you apply for citizenship in Canada?

To get a citizenship status you must be a permanent resident of Canada and have lived here for at least three out of the last five years.

Are babies born in Canada automatically citizens?

Canada is one of the few countries that automatically grant citizenship to babies who were born here.

Which countries can I visit with Canadian PR?

With a Canadian PR card, you can travel to many countries without going through a hectic process of visa application, countries like Anguilla, Bahamas, Bermuda, Cayman Islands, Costa Rica, and more.

What is free with Canadian citizenship?

As a citizen of Canada, you get free admission to museums, science centers, art galleries, and parks across Canada.

Is it hard to gain citizenship in Canada?

Getting a Canadian citizenship status is a bit tough. You have to be a permanent resident first and must have lived in Canada for at least three out of the last five years.

Latest posts by Sagar Khillar (see all)

Search DifferenceBetween.net :



Help us improve. Rate this post! 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars
Loading...

Email This Post Email This Post : If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.


Leave a Response

Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

References :


[0]US citizen and Immigration Services at www.uscis.gov

Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.


See more about : ,
Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Finder