Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Nanotechnology and Nanoscience

Over the past two decades, there’s been a lot of buzz surrounding the word “nanotechnology” and how this new technology is changing the world around us with myriad applications. It is already integrated into our everyday lives in various forms such as nanoparticles containing sunscreen lotions, dirt-resistant glass/paint with nanocoatings, and the various nanocomposite materials. Initially, the focus of nanotechnology development was on the discovery of new phenomena and the convergence of disciplines from basic knowledge of control of matter at the nanoscale to novel science platforms. From all these developments, nanotechnology seems to be bridging the gap between imagination and reality.

However, all this makes us wonder what exactly is this nanotechnology and how does it differ from nanoscience. The term ‘nano’ simply denotes a scale of 10-9, in terms of dimension of materials.  Therefore, one nanometer is one-billionth of a meter. So the objects falling under the nanotechnology regime is likely to have one or more dimensions in the nanometer scale. Nanoscience and nanotechnology have gained recognition worldwide as interesting themes in science and engineering, and particularly for their potential industrial applications. Both are the study of extremely small things and can be used across all the other fields of science.

 

What is Nanoscience?

Nanoscience is the study and application of structures and materials that have dimensions at the nano scale level. Nanoscience is the study of nanomaterials and their properties, and the understanding of how these materials, at the molecular level, provide novel properties and physical, chemical and biological phenomena that have been successfully used in innovative ways in a wide range of industries. Some of the unique aspects of nano systems arise solely from the tiny size of the systems. There is more to nanoscience than technology. Nanoscience is where atomic physics converges with the physics and chemistry of complex systems. Feynman’s 1959 talk is often cited as a source of inspiration for Nanoscience but it was only published as a scientific paper in 1992. The remarkable technological implications laid out in Feynman’s talk actually form the basis of the impression of Nanoscience for most of the people.

 

What is Nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is the science and technology of objects at the nanoscale level, the properties of which differ significantly from that of their constituent material at the macroscopic or even microscopic scale. It is a multidisciplinary field that encompasses understanding and control of matter at about 1-100 nm, leading to development of innovative and revolutionary applications. The International Standards Organization has also recently defined nanotechnology as “understanding and control of matter and processes at the nanoscale, typically, but not exclusively, below 100 nm in one or more dimensions where the onset of size-dependent phenomena usually enables novel applications, where one nanometer is one thousand millionth of a meter.” Understanding the underlying science of nanoscale interactions is important to the development of technology. These interactions constitute one of the main areas of research in the field of nanotechnology.

 

Difference between Nanotechnology and Nanoscience

Definition

– Nanoscience and Nanotechnology are the study and applications of extremely small things, the materials with nanometer dimensions. Nanoscience is where atomic physics converges with the physics and chemistry of complex systems. Nanotechnology is the science and technology of objects at the nanoscale level, the properties of which differ significantly from that of their constituent material at the macroscopic or even microscopic scale. When we’re talking about nanotechnology, we are talking about a scale – an order of magnitude – of size, or length. Nanoscience is the study of structures and materials on the nanoscale.

Science

– Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that encompasses understanding and control of matter at about 1-100 nm, leading to development of innovative and revolutionary applications. It encompasses nanoscale science, engineering and technology in addition to modeling and manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular and supramolecular scale. Nanoscience is about the phenomena that occur in systems with nanometer dimensions and it involves understanding the fundamental interactions of physical systems confined to nanoscale dimensions and their properties.

Applications

– Nanotechnology has applications in a number of different industries and fields, including agriculture and food industry, automobile industry, aerospace, defense, construction sector, healthcare and medicine, power generation, molecular diagnostics, textile industry, and more. Understanding the forces and theories at play within nanotechnology is just one aspect of nanoscience. That being said, nanomaterials are being used in a variety of manufacturing processes, products and healthcare, along with cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Nanotechnology vs. Nanoscience: Comparison Chart

 

Summary of Nanotechnology vs. Nanoscience

Nanotechnology is the science and technology of objects at the nanoscale level. One important aspect of nanotechnology is the modeling of nanoscale devices, materials and interactions. Understanding the underlying science of nanoscale interactions is important to the development of technology. These interactions constitute one of the main areas of research in the field of nanotechnology. However, Nanoscience refers to the study, applications and manipulation of materials and structures on the nanometer scale. Understanding the forces and theories at play within nanotechnology is just one aspect of nanoscience. Simply put, Nanoscience is about the phenomena that occur in systems with nanometer dimensions.


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References :


[0]Image credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Technology_applications_of_quantum_nanoscience.jpg

[1]Image credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Application_of_nanotechnology.jpg

[2]Allhoff, Fritz, et al. What Is Nanotechnology and Why Does It Matter?. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Print

[3]Lindsay, Stuart. Introduction to Nanoscience. Oxford, United Kingdom: OUP, 2009. Print

[4]Van de Voorde, Marcel. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Advances and Developments in Nano-sized Materials. Berlin, Germany: Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2018. Print

[5]Sengupta, Amretashis and Chandan Kumar Sarkar. Introduction to Nano: Basics to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. Berlin, Germany: Springer, 2015. Print

[6]Nouailhat, Alain. An Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2010. Print

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