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Difference Between MAC 10 and MAC 11

MAC10


MAC 10 vs MAC 11

Gordon B. Ingram designed the MAC 10 in the early 1970s as a compact machine gun. His goal was to make a machine gun that was compact, lightweight, affordable, and reliable. He built it with as few working parts as possible to reduce cost and increase reliability. Little did Ingram know, his M10 design would become very popular. He designed a 9 mm and .45 ACP M10 and then later made the MAC 11 in a 9mm and a .380 ACP version. There are many differences between the two MACs, the biggest being their size, caliber, construction, and manufacturer.

The MAC 10 .45 ACP vs. the MAC 11 .380 ACP

The .45 caliber MAC 10 weighs 6.26 pounds when empty and it fires 1,145 rounds per minute. The maximum effective firing range is 50 meters and the muzzle velocity is 280 feet per second. The .380 caliber MAC 11 weighs only 3.5 pounds, fires 1,200 rounds per minute and has a muzzle velocity of 980 feet per second. The effective firing range is 50 meters. Which gun to get is really a matter of preference in size and caliber. The .45 round is much more powerful than the .380, but the M10 also weighs twice as much and has a slower muzzle velocity.

The Difference Between the MAC 11/9 and the MAC10/9

If you are looking for a 9mm machine gun and cannot decide between the 10 or the 11, then there are a few more differences to consider. As mentioned earlier, the M11 is much lighter than the M10. This is because it is constructed with a thinner gauge of sheet metal. The weight and size of the M11 makes a big difference when trying to conceal it. You may be wondering about the reliability of a thinner sheet metal, but the M11 has proven that it holds up just as well as the M10.

The MAC 11/9 and MAC 10/9 Magazines

The M11 and M10 also use different magazines. If you purchase the MAC 11 you can get a Zytel mag or a steel one. The M10 only uses steel magazines. If you find an M11 with a Zytel magazine be prepared for reliability issues. The feed lip has a tendency to break. Luckily, you have the option of purchasing a conversion kit and then being able to use a steel mag. With the M10, you get the steel magazine. Unfortunately, replacements are becoming more rare and expensive.

Suppressors for the MAC 10 and MAC 11

If you are a collector who wants all of the original accessories, then you are probably interested in learning about the two suppressors that were built for the guns. There is a single-stage suppressor and a two-stage suppressor. The first to be introduced to the market was the two-stage suppressor that featured a wipeless design. Later on the single-stage suppressor was manufactured but it used Nomex wipes which ended up being very unpopular due to the need to replace the wipes too often. If you are considering purchasing one of the two guns, look for sets that come with the two-stage suppressor. The one-stage suppressors are less valuable.

Availability of the MAC 11 and MAC 10

We all know that the rarity of a gun affects its cost. Of all the MAC models, the M11/9 is the most common. SWD reported manufacturing 17,000 of M11/9 and 3,800 of the .380 caliber M11. Even less copies were made of the M10 models. This makes the M11 cost about half of what an M10 usually does. Both guns are considered to be collector’s items now, but since the M11 is more readily available, it won’t break the bank.


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2 Comments

  1. Muzzle velocity of the Mac 10 is 280 METERS per second, not feet.

  2. The .45 velocity is WAY OFF!
    280 FPS!?!?

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