Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between DNA and Genes

dnaThe terms gene and DNA are often used to mean the same. However, in reality, they stand for very different things. So, next time you want to blame your baldness on your father and don’t know whether to berate your genes or your DNA, take a look at the differences below:

DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid. This is the chain of ‘links’ that determines how the different cells in your body will function. Each of these links is called a nucleotide. DNA basically contains two copies of 23 chromosomes each, one from the mother and one from the father of the person. Only some of these complex cells carry the ‘genetic information for your genes. These are the parts that decide what you basically inherit from your parents. This makes genes only a subset of the DNA.

Your genes define the fundamental traits you will inherit from your parents. They are parts of the DNA that determine how the cells are going to live and function. They are special colonies of nucleotides that decide how proteins are going to carry on the process of building and reproducing in your body. All living things depend on their genes to determine how they are going to develop in their lives and how they, in turn are going to pass on their genetic traits to their offspring.

For instance, if you thought about the human body as a book that contained only DNA, the genes would be the chapter containing instructions on how to make proteins and assist in cell production. The other chapters may contain other details like where the cells should start producing new proteins etc.

The DNA is like an instruction booklet that determines the traits you are likely to get. The entire DNA in a human body is packaged in the form of chromosomes. Each of these genechromosomes has definite characters that will determine a particular trait. This includes such details like your hair color and the color of your eyes. Each of these chapters that contain the codes for a particular trait is known as a gene. So, if you are confused, just think about the gene as a small piece of the total DNA that holds information about a particular trait you have.

The study of genetics has gained widespread acclaim in recent times. However, it was only with the discovery of the DNA that a scientific basis for the genes we inherit was established.

Both DNA and genes are the most basic building blocks of your body. They determine how your cells are going to behave throughout your life. Now you know who to thank for those brains!

Summary:
1.   Genes are a part of the DNA.
2.  Genes determine the traits you will inherit from your parents, DNA determines a lot more.
3.  Genes have been studied for a long time now. The study of DNA is a relatively recent development.


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