Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Differences Between Giant Squid And Colossal Squid

Will you believe me that a squid is bigger than an octopus? Some of you may and some of you may not. We have always thought that the squid is a smaller version of an octopus. However, there are species of squid which are actually even bigger than the largest octopus of the world. The largest octopus in the world is the North Pacific giant octopus, which can measure up to 14 feet, but the species of squid I am talking about are even larger than 14 feet. Have you heard about the giant squid and the colossal squid? If not, you have come to the right place to know more about them.

Giant squid

The giant squid is a marine invertebrate which belongs to the family Architeuthidae. It can grow up to the size of a school bus. The approximate size of female giant squids is 43 feet, while male giant squids are only 33 feet.  These measurements are from their posterior fins up to the tip of their two long tentacles. The discovery of the giant squid was on September 30, 2004 in Japan.

The giant squid is very much like the smaller squid species. It has a mantle, eight arms, and two longer tentacles. Among the cephalopod group, the giant squid holds the record of the longest known tentacles. It is also said that the giant squid, as well as the colossal squid, has the biggest eyes of any living animal. Its eyes are about a foot in diameter. Since it lives deep in the ocean, its big eyes are especially useful since the deepest parts of the ocean have minimal light.

This big species of squid loves to eat deep sea fishes. They will use their long powerful tentacles and grip their prey using their giant suckers, which are lined with small teeth. However, the giant squid is also a favorite prey of another giant animal of the sea – the sperm whale. Sperm whales are very skilled in hunting down giant squids. Because of this, scientists follow sperm whales in hopes of finding a giant squid.

You can see giant squids in all of the world’s oceans, except in tropical and polar latitudes. Giant squids can be found in the North Atlantic Ocean, the South Atlantic Ocean, the North Pacific Ocean and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean. Specifically, you can find them on the coasts of Norway, Northern British Isles, Spain, Azores, Madeira, Southern Africa, Japan, New Zealand and Australia.

Colossal squid

You might be surprised, but there is another species of squid even bigger than the giant squid: the colossal squid. The colossal squid is also known as the Antarctic or giant cranch squid. It is the only species of squid that belongs to the genus of Mesonychoteuthis. It is the largest species of invertebrate, having a measurement of 39 to 46 feet.

While giant squids have arms and tentacles with suckers lined with small teeth, the colossal squid’s arms and tentacles have sharp swiveling hooks. The body of the colossal squid is also wider and stouter than the giant squid, making it a heavier animal. Though the colossal squid is longer in length than the giant squid, its tentacles are shorter while the mantle is longer.

The colossal squid loves to prey on chaetognatha, Patagonian toothfish and other types of fish using its bioluminescence. Sperm whales also love to prey on colossal squids. Because of that, the bodies of sperm whales obtain scars as a result of their encounters with colossal squids. Colossal squids are commonly found in the Southern Ocean.

Summary:

  1. The giant squid is a marine invertebrate which belongs to the family Architeuthidae.

  2. The colossal squid is also known as the Antarctic or giant cranch squid. It is the only species of squid that belongs to the genus of Mesonychoteuthis.

  3. The colossal squid is bigger than the giant squid.


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