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Difference Between Acetone and Nail Polish Remover

In all industries, solvents are widely used, in the day to day product applications. For instance, they are used in the pharmaceutical, beauty, personal care, and even industrial applications. They dissolve, extract or suspend other materials, without changing the chemical compositions. In the cosmetic industry, they are used to dissolve ingredients hence enabling them to work properly. Lotions, shaving creams, and even powders have solvents which add to the consistency of the products. Some of the solvents used in the beauty industries include ethanol and acetone. 

 

 

 

What is Acetone?

This is a volatile, flammable and colorless liquid that is miscible with water. It is hence used as a solvent in many industries such as pharmaceutical, beauty and domestic sectors. It is a good solvent for synthetic fibers and plastics, hence is used for cleaning tools, dissolving two-part epoxies and even superglue. It’s also used in paints and varnishes, and in the preparation of metal before painting. In the beauty industry, it is the primary ingredient in nail polish removers. 

 

What is Nail Polish Remover?

This is an organic solvent that may include coloring, scents, oils and, solvents. The most common component in nail polish removers is acetone or ethyl acetate. These two assists in the easy removal of polish. Care should, however, be taken as they can be harsh on the nails and the skin.  

 

Similarities between Acetone and Nail Polish Remover

  • Both are solvents
  • Both are flammable
  • Both may irritate the skin and nails
  • Both are volatile
  • Both may have adverse health effects when ingested or inhaled

 

Differences between Acetone and Nail Polish Remover 

  1. Definition

Acetone is a volatile, flammable and colorless liquid that is miscible with water. On the other hand, nail polish remover is an organic solvent that may include coloring, scents, oils, and solvents.

  1. Components

While acetone is a component used in nail polish removers, nail polish removers may contain different types of solvents. 

  1. Miscibility with water

While acetone is miscible with water, nail polish removers may not be miscible with water, depending on the components used. 

  1. Uses

Acetone is used is widely used as a solvent in many industries such as pharmaceutical, beauty, and domestic industries. On the other hand, nail polish remover is only used in the beauty industry. 

Acetone vs. Nail Polish Remover: Comparison Table

 

Summary of Acetone vs. Nail Polish Remover

The beauty industry has greatly evolved, with the advancement of nail art, which has led to the use of certain products for diverse uses. Such is acetone and nail polish remover. Although either may be used to dissolve nail polish, they may have different ingredients, whereby acetone can be used as a component of the polish remover or not. Care should, however, be taken in both of them as they can irritate the skin and nails. 

 

Tabitha Njogu

Tabitha graduated from Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology with a Bachelor’s Degree in Commerce, whereby she specialized in Finance. She has had the pleasure of working with various organizations and garnered expertise in business management, business administration, accounting, finance operations, and digital marketing.

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References :


[0]Image credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nail_polish_remover.jpg

[1]Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pheezy/83658850

[2]Terry C & Ryan R. Toxicology Desk Reference: The Toxic Exposure & Medical Monitoring Index. CRC Press Publishers, 1999. https://books.google.co.ke/books?id=uM49rmz1vEsC&pg=PA17&dq=Difference+between+acetone+vs+nail+polish+remover&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiZ24fapszgAhUIlhQKHT6pDYcQ6AEIOTAD#v=onepage&q=Difference%20between%20acetone%20vs%20nail%20polish%20remover&f=false

[3]Heldman D & Singh R. Introduction to Food Engineering- Food Science and Technology. Academic Press Publishers, 2008.  https://books.google.co.ke/books?id=jebJgWHADi4C&pg=PA596&dq=Difference+between+acetone+vs+nail+polish+remover&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiZ24fapszgAhUIlhQKHT6pDYcQ6AEIQDAE#v=onepage&q=Difference%20between%20acetone%20vs%20nail%20polish%20remover&f=false

[4]Dudzinska M. Management of Indoor Air Quality. CRC Press Publishers, 2011.  https://books.google.co.ke/books?id=6v3NBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA67&dq=Difference+between+acetone+vs+nail+polish+remover&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiZ24fapszgAhUIlhQKHT6pDYcQ6AEISDAF#v=onepage&q=Difference%20between%20acetone%20vs%20nail%20polish%20remover&f=false

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