Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Prediabetes and Diabetes

What is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a condition characterized by a sustained increase in blood sugar, insufficient to be defined as diabetes. It is seen as a transient stage between normal metabolic balance and diabetes.

There are two types of prediabetes:

  • Impaired glucose tolerance;
  • Impaired fasting glucose.

The diagnosis of prediabetes is based on measurement of the blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are measured in the morning, after 8-10 hours of fasting. This test alone is not enough to make a diagnosis. To confirm it, the so-called glucose tolerance test is done. In the morning, the patient drinks a solution of 100 grams of glucose and her/his blood sugar levels are measured for two hours at certain intervals. The normal sugar levels are considered to be between 6.1 mmol/l and 7.8 mmol/l two hours after glucose intake.

If the patient has blood sugar level below 7 mmol/l after fasting and between 7.8 and 11 mmol/l, two hours after glucose intake, she/he has impaired glucose tolerance.

If the blood sugar levels are from 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/l after fasting and below 7.8 mmol/l two hours after glucose intake the patient has impaired fasting glucose.

The prediabetes is largely asymptomatic. There are a few possible symptoms that may occur, but they are non-specific, which may allow prediabetes to progress imperceptibly to diabetes. Such symptoms are sudden and strong increase in appetite, strong and indolent thirst, sudden and unexplained weight changes, tiredness, flu-like symptoms, delayed skin wound healing.

If the prediabetes is diagnosed in time, in most cases it is possible to prevent diabetes and its complications. This can be mainly achieved by reducing body weight (in the presence of obesity), increasing physical activity and positive changes in eating habits (limiting fat and sugars).

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease characterized by an increased level of blood sugar due to a weakened cell response to insulin or insufficient production of insulin in the body.

There are three types of diabetes: 

  • Type 1 diabetes – resulting from the inability of the body to produce insulin; 
  • Type 2 diabetes – resulting from the inability of cells to respond to insulin, sometimes in combination with decreased production of the hormone; 
  • Gestational diabetes – occurring during pregnancy.

Diabetes is characterized by intermittent or persistent hyperglycemia and is diagnosed by any of the following:

  • Fasting blood sugar ≥ 7 mmol/L;
  • Blood glucose levels two hours after oral administration of 100 g of glucose in a glucose tolerance test≥ 11.1 mmol/L;
  • Symptoms of hyperglycemia and temporary blood sugar levels ≥ 11.1 mmol/L;
  • Level of glycated hemoglobin ≥ 6.5%;

The most common symptoms of diabetes are:

  • Increased urination – when the kidney’s glucose threshold (about 10 mmol/l) is exceeded, blood sugar begins to be excreted in the urine, taking a significant amount of water and causing more frequent and abundant urination;
  • Increased thirst – to compensate for increased urine output, the body extracts intracellular water in the blood, causing dehydration and increased thirst;
  • Increased appetite – usually more pronounced in type 2 diabetes, where the high level of insulin stimulates the feeling of hunger. 

There are some less common symptoms of diabetes, including blurred vision, frequent infections, difficult healing of wounds, weight loss, ketoacidosis, irritability, lethargy, confusion, etc.

All forms of diabetes can be controlled by artificially bringing insulin into the body. Type 2diabetes can be controlled to some extent with other medications. 

With the exception of gestational diabetes, which typically disappears after childbirth, diabetes usually cannot be cured and is a chronic condition.

Without medical treatment, diabetes can cause many acute complications, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar coma. Severe long-term complications associated with diabetes include renal failure, cardiovascular disease, diabetic retinopathy, etc.

 

Difference Between Prediabetes and Diabetes

  1. Definition

Prediabetes: Prediabetes is a condition characterized by a sustained increase in blood sugar, insufficient to be defined as diabetes. It is seen as a transient stage between normal metabolic balance and diabetes.

Diabetes: Diabetes is a disease characterized by an increased level of blood sugar due to a weakened cell response to insulin or insufficient production of insulin in the body.

  1. Types

Prediabetes: There are two types of prediabetes – impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose.

Diabetes: There are three types of diabetes – type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

  1. Diagnosis

Prediabetes: If the patient has blood sugar levels below 7 mmol/l after fasting and between 7.8 and 11 mmol/l, two hours after glucose intake, she/he has impaired glucose tolerance; if the blood sugar levels are from 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/l after fasting and below 7.8 mmol/l two hours after glucose intake, the patient has impaired fasting glucose.

Diabetes: Diabetes is diagnosed by any of the following: fasting blood sugar ≥ 7 mmol/l, blood sugar levels two hours after oral administration of 100 g of glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/l, symptoms of hyperglycemia and temporary blood sugar levels ≥ 11.1 mmol/l, level of glycated hemoglobin ≥ 6.5%.

  1. Symptoms

Prediabetes: The prediabetes is largely asymptomatic. The possible non-specific symptoms include sudden and strong increase in appetite, strong and indolent thirst, sudden and unexplained weight changes, tiredness, flu-like symptoms, delayed skin wound healing. 

Diabetes: The most common symptoms of diabetes are increased urination, increased thirst, and increased appetite. The less common symptoms include blurred vision, frequent infections, difficult healing of wounds, weight loss, ketoacidosis, irritability, lethargy, confusion, etc.

  1. Treatment

Prediabetes: If the prediabetes is diagnosed in time, in most cases it is possible to prevent diabetes and its complications by reducing body weight (in the presence of obesity), increasing physical activity and positive changes in eating habits.

Diabetes: All forms of diabetes can be controlled by artificially bringing insulin into the body. Type 2 diabetes can be controlled to some extent with other medications. 

Prediabetes Vs. Diabetes: Comparison Chart

 

Summary of Prediabetes verses Diabetes: 

  • Prediabetes is a transient stage between normal metabolic balance and diabetes characterized by a sustained increase in blood sugar, insufficient to be defined as diabetes. 
  • Diabetes is a disease characterized by an increased level of blood sugar due to a weakened cell response to insulin or insufficient production of insulin in the body.
  • There are two types of prediabetes – impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose. The types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.
  • If the patient has blood sugar levels below 7 mmol/l after fasting and between 7.8 and 11 mmol/l two hours after glucose intake, she/he has impaired glucose tolerance; if the blood sugar levels are from 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/l after fasting and below 7.8 mmol/l two hours after glucose intake, the patient has impaired fasting glucose. The patient has diabetes in the following cases: fasting blood sugar ≥ 7 mmol/l, blood sugar levels two hours after oral administration of 100 g of glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/l, symptoms of hyperglycemia and temporary blood sugar levels ≥ 11.1 mmol/l, level of glycated hemoglobin ≥ 6.5%.
  • The prediabetes is largely asymptomatic. The most common symptoms of diabetes are increased urination, increased thirst, and increased appetite. 
  • If the prediabetes is diagnosed in time, in most cases it is possible to prevent diabetes and its complications by reducing body weight (in the presence of obesity), increasing physical activity and positive changes in eating habits. All forms of diabetes can be controlled by artificially bringing insulin into the body. Type 2 diabetes can be controlled to some extent with other medications. 

 


Search DifferenceBetween.net :

Custom Search


Help us improve. Rate this post! 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars
Loading...

Email This Post Email This Post : If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.



Leave a Response

Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

References :


[0]Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/thehearttruth/7263808056

[1]Image credit: https://pixabay.com/en/diabetes-icon-glucose-blood-meter-1710296/

[2]Holt, R., C. Cockram, A. Flyvbjerg, B. Goldstein. Textbook of Diabetes. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons. 2011. Print. 

[3]Rubin, A. Diabetes For Dummies. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons. 2012. Print. 

[4]Weiner, S. L. Josel. The Complete Diabetes Organizer. Ann Arbor: Spry Publishing. 2013. Print. 

Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.


See more about : ,
Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Finder