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Difference Between Angina Pectoris and Myocardial Infarction

Angina Pectoris vs. Myocardial Infarction

Angina and myocardial infarction both concern the heart and its functions. Angina pectoris is a syndrome, and myocardial infarction is a fatal condition which can lead to the abrupt death of a person. Myocardial infarction and angina pectoris are two significantly serious disorders and are frequently interchanged. Early identification of angina pectoris may avert the disorder from progressing into myocardial infarction. This write-up aims to directly indicate the differences among the two and give the necessary interventions to manage them.

Angina pectoris can be medically termed as chest pain, an outcome of ischemia, or the reduction in the blood supply to the myocardium of the heart from the coronary arteries. The insufficiency of blood supply is due to the inadequacy of oxygen that reaches the heart. The pain in the chest is linked to angina pectoris as described by the patient as a pressing, squeezing, choking, bursting, or burning sensation felt at the sternum. Pain may be abrupt and recurrent, frequently resulting from physical exertion, and is relieved by nitroglycerin and rest. The predisposing factor that attack depends on is the type of angina the person has because they vary on their precipitating factors.

On the other hand, myocardial infarction is a medical emergency more commonly called a heart attack. It is an outcome of the destruction or death of myocardial cells that is due to the insufficiency of oxygen. The pain in this condition is expressed to be excruciating or crushing and typically spreads from the heart to the shoulders, jaw, neck, and back. The chest pain and other associated symptoms are not relieved by nitroglycerin or rest.

Both disorders can be confirmed using an electrocardiogram or ECG. Electrocardiogram test results of the patient with symptoms of angina pectoris illustrate an ST-segment depression. Whereas for patients who have myocardial infarction, it illustrates a T-wave inversion and ST segment depression or elevation. Angina pectoris can as well be confirmed using a stress test during exercise. In contrast with angina, myocardial infarction can be additionally confirmed by laboratory tests such as elevated levels of creatinine phospokinase, myoglobin, and troponin.

Management for a patient that has angina pectoris involve nitroglycerin administration to relieve the pain. The patient can be reminiscent of the burning feeling beneath the tongue after administering nitroglycerin which can indicate its potency. Thus, it can also be a side effect such as flushing of the face and headache.

On the contrary, the interventions for the patient who is completely diagnosed to have myocardial infarction involve oxygen administration, Demerol administration to ease the pain, proper positioning of the patient in a medium to high-back chair to promote rest, to allow the lungs to completely expand and augment oxygen intake, as well as sustaining a low-salt, low-cholesterol, and low-fat diet.

As many people would tell, a small amount of prevention is at all times better that a ton of cure. In a society with staple foods like instant meals, the public should be extremely careful upon choosing the accessible food preferences. A healthy and well-balanced diet along with regular exercise will surely help people decrease the chances of having cardiovascular disorders such as myocardial infarction and angina pectoris.

Summary:

1.Angina pectoris is a syndrome, and myocardial infarction is a fatal condition which can lead to the abrupt death of a person.

2.Myocardial infarction and angina pectoris are two significantly serious disorders and are frequently interchanged. Early identification of angina pectoris may avert the disorder from progressing into myocardial infarction.

3.Angina pectoris can be medically termed as chest pain, an outcome of ischemia, or the reduction on the blood supply to the myocardium of the heart from the coronary arteries. On the other hand, myocardial infarction is a medical emergency more commonly called a heart attack.

4.The insufficiency of the blood supply in angina pectoris is due to the inadequacy of oxygen that reaches the heart. The pain in the chest is linked to angina pectoris as described by the patient as a pressing, squeezing, choking, bursting, or burning sensation felt at the sternum.

5.Myocardial infarction is an outcome of the destruction or death of myocardial cells that is due to the insufficiency of oxygen. The pain in this condition is expressed to be excruciating or crushing and typically spreads from the heart to the shoulders, jaw, neck, and back.

6.For angina pectoris, the chest pain and other associated symptoms are not relieved by nitroglycerin or rest.

7.Electrocardiogram test results of the patient with symptoms of angina pectoris illustrate an ST segment depression. Whereas for patients who have myocardial infarction, it illustrates a T-wave inversion and ST-segment depression or elevation.

8.Angina pectoris can be confirmed using a stress test during exercise. In contrast with angina, myocardial infarction can be additionally confirmed by laboratory tests such as elevated levels of creatinine phospokinase, myoglobin, and troponin.

9.Management for a patient that has angina pectoris involve nitroglycerin administration to relieve the pain. On the contrary, the interventions for a patient who is completely diagnosed to have myocardial infarction involves oxygen administration, Demerol administration to ease the pain, and proper positioning.


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5 Comments

  1. show with sample ECGs is better than meaning only.

  2. I fear that the point numbered 6 in the summary has to be corrected to,
    “are relieved with nitroglycerin or rest ”

    thankyou

  3. so explanatory and so much infomation at hand .thank yuo for that piece of work am moved

  4. in summaries number 6: i think it shold be about MI, not angina pectoris.

  5. Thanks for this. It’s much clearer now. And I think point number 6 has an issue.

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