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Difference Between Hungry Jack’s and Burger King

 Hungry Jack’s vs Burger King

When it comes down to burgers, two names had been known to be on the top of the game, and they go by the name Burger King and Hungry Jack’s. Don’t get too confused about the different brand names because they originally came under one corporation, and that is the Burger King Corporation.

Insta-Burger King was first founded by Keith J. Kramer and Matthew Burns in 1953, and it was located at Jacksonville, Florida. The brand name did well for a time but later had some problems. Changes were necessary, and they were headed by James McLamore and David R. Edgerton. The first thing that they did was to completely restructure the company chain and renamed it Burger King. They also did a few changes in their menu and made it more appealing to the masses.

When Burger King decided to expand its reach into Australia, they found out that their brand name was already used by a local food shop. That left them with no other choice but to pick an alternative brand name for their products that they are going to introduce in the Australian market. Jack Cowin (owner of the Burger King franchise in Australia) was then asked to pick another name among their trademark names registered under the Burger King Corporation.

He then chose the name ‘Hungry Jack’ and personalized it by adding an apostrophe ‘s.’ Hungry Jack’s was first stationed on Innaloo, Perth on April 18, 1971. Jack Corwin renewed their franchise agreement with Burger King Corporation on 1991 which allowed them to license third-party franchises. Hungry Jack’s slowly gained popularity in the Australian market, and more and more people became more familiar with their brand name.

Hungry Jack’s only sells two of the Burger King Trademark products, and they are the Whopper and the TenderCrisp sandwiches. Hungry Jack’s also has their own specialty burger which is called the Aussie Burger. It is made from traditional fish and chips with fried egg, bacon, onion, beetroot, traditional meat, lettuce and tomato. The themes used for Hungry Jack’s are still the same during the 1950’s, and it seems that the company thinks that it is more popular this way.

When Hungry Jack’s contract with Burger King lapsed, Burger King filed a legal case on Hungry Jack’s concerning a breach of contract. They claimed that Hungry Jack’s wasn’t able to meet the conditions that they had set on their contract and moved to terminate their agreement. Jack Corwin and his company then began their own legal proceedings and won over Burger King. The Supreme Court of New South Wales found the Burger King Corporation guilty for breaking their agreement with Hungry Jack’s and thus awarding Jack Corwin with $46.9 million for winning the case.

The Burger King Corporation then decided to pull their operation out from Australia, and Hungry Jack’s became the leading brand name when it comes to burgers in the Australian market. Even so, Burger King still holds over 12,200 outlets worldwide and is still one of the leading names in the fast-food industry.

Summary:

1. Hungry Jack’s was a franchise from the Burger King Corporation.
2. Burger King allowed James Corwin to choose a registered trademark name under the Burger King Corporation.
3. Burger King filed a case against Hungry Jack’s for a breach of contract.
4. Hungry Jack’s has won the case, and James Corwin was awarded $46.9 million for winning the case against Burger Kin.


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