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Difference Between SSI and SSA

SSI vs SSA

During a person’s productive years, he works in order to provide for his everyday needs and to save for the time when he is no longer able to work. Most governments, including the United States government, have created agencies that oversee programs that provide benefits to individuals who reach retirement age.

The benefits are given to those who are eligible. There are also programs that provide for aged, blind, children, and disabled individuals. Two such programs are the SSA and the SSI.

The Social Security Administration is a United States federal government agency that oversees the insurance program of the government which offers retirement, disability, and survivorship benefits to members of Social Security.
Every able-bodied and productive person is required to pay Social Security taxes from his income and earnings. This is mandatory, and the benefits that a member receives upon retirement are based on his contributions.

The SSA was created through the Social Security Act of 1935 as part of then President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. It was funded by the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and started collecting taxes in 1937.
Retired and disabled members, their spouses, and children, and survivors of insured workers are eligible to receive benefits from Social Security. The amount varies according to the income credits that a member earned during the time that he was still working.

The Supplementary Security Income (SSI), on the other hand, is a federal income supplement program of the United States government which is funded by general tax revenues rather than by Social Security taxes. It is intended for aged, blind, disabled people, and children who have no income to pay for basic needs.

By “aged,” a person must be 65 years old and above, and although he is not disabled, he must be financially limited. By “disabled,” it is meant that a person has a mental and/or physical impairment. He must also be a U.S. citizen.
In order to qualify for the program, an individual must have limited resources which means that he has no work, no S.S. benefits, no workers’ compensation, and no unemployment benefits. He must not have any resources such as bank accounts, vehicles, personal properties, life insurance, or land.

Summary:

1.The Social Security Administration (SSA) is an agency of the United States federal government that is tasked with overseeing its insurance program intended to provide benefits to retired and disabled members and their families while the Supplementary Security Income (SSI) is a program of the United States federal government that provides supplementary income to aged, blind, and disabled individuals, and children who have no means of income.
2.The SSA requires members and future beneficiaries to pay Social Security taxes while the SSI does not require any payment from its beneficiaries.
3.The SSA is funded by the Social Security taxes that its members mandatorily pay while the SSI is funded by general taxes.
4.The beneficiaries of the SSI are individuals that have no means of income, no personal or real property, and no bank accounts or life insurance while beneficiaries of the SSA may have other sources of income and own properties.


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