Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Ale and Stout

Ale vs Stout

There are different varieties of beer. Among the different kinds of beer, Ale and Stout are most popular. Ale, which is often described as robust, fruity and hearty, is made from top fermenting yeast. Tout, which is richly flavored, dark and heavy, is made from pale malt, caramel malt and unmalted barley.

Ale is basically made from malted barley through warm fermentation with the help of yeast. Ales are normally brewed at temperatures ranging between 15 to 25 degrees. As it ferements, the yeast rises on to the top, which gives the Ale a sweet flavour and taste. Ale also contains hops that give it an herbal flavour.

Unlike Ale, Stout is a darker beer. Stouts are also strong when compared to Ale. The alcohol content in Stout is higher than in Ale. Moreover, Stouts also come in dark colours, much darker than Ales. When compared to Stouts, Ales are matured only for a short time.

The word Stout was first found in the Egerton Manuscript, a document that dates back to 1677. The word Stout was used for strong or stout beers. Ale is a native English word and has been derived from Old English alu or ealu.

Both Ale and Stout comes in many variations. Stouts are flavoured with dark fruit, chocolate or coffee. Some of the Stout varities include Baltic porter, dry stout, imperial stout, oatmeal stout, oyster stout, chocolate stout and coffee stout. Ale comes in variations like Brown ale, Pale ale, Scotch ales, Mild ales, Burton ales, Old ales and Belgian ales.

Summary

1. Ale, which is often described as robust, fruity and hearty, is made from top fermenting yeast. Tout, which is richly flavoured, dark and heavy, is made from pale malt, caramel malt and unmalted barley.

2. Unlike Ale, Stout is a darker beer.

3. Stouts are also strong when compared to Ale.

4. The alcohol content in Stout is higher than in Ale.

5. Stouts come in dark colours, much darker than Ales. When compared to Stouts, Ales are matured only for a short time.

6. Stout is normally used for strong or stout beers. The word Stout was first found in the Egerton Manuscript, a document that dates back to 1677. Ale is a native English word and has been derived from Old English alu or ealu.

7. Both Ale and Stout comes in many variations.


Search DifferenceBetween.net :

Custom Search



1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 2.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...


Email This Post Email This Post : If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.



See more about : , ,

3 Comments

  1. Who wrote this article? Some corrections: First, stout is a type of ale. Second, stouts and ales can both be very dark although stout is almost exclusively dark. Third, alcohol content can range from low to high in both stouts and ales; one does not necessarily have more. Stouts are also not necessarily stronger in taste. Guiness, for example, is quite light compared to most ales. It has a different flavour but isn’t “strong” in any way.

  2. “There are different varieties of beer” is probably the only correct fact in this article. In addition to what jack said (every bit of which is correct), it is a common misconception that dark=strong when it comes to beer. “Strong” in reference to beer can mean a few things; high alcohol content, boldness of flavors, prevalence of hops, etc. Any type of ale – pale, saison, stout, wheat, amber, etc. – can be considered “strong” depending on the recipe. Actually, you’ll find that IPAs generally are the “strongest” ale.
    Also, “Baltic porter” is a type of porter (surprise!), which is a different (although similar) style of ale from stout.

  3. Like Billy and jack said, whoever wrote this article has no idea what they’re talking about. He might as well have said that stouts come from the utters of albino black sheep.

Leave a Response

Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.


Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Finder