Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between York Rite and Scottish Rite

scottish_rite_bookYork Rite vs Scottish Rite

It is interesting to note the real difference between two often-confused terms, which are York Rite and Scottish Rite. Both of these terms actually refer to degrees in Freemasonry. This is a fraternal organisation which originated a long time ago, in the 16th to 17th century. Around the world, there is an estimated five million members of the Freemasonry organisation, including those from the United States, England, Scotland and Ireland.

So what are the main differences between the York and the Scottish Rites? Firstly, there’s the York Rite. By definition, this refers to a collection of Masonic degrees which are usually conferred separately. The term York Rite originated from the city of York, where the first meetings of the Masons in England took place. On the other hand, Scottish Rites refer to the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, conferred to Freemasonry members in the United States.

Both Scottish and York Rites are dedicated to the benefit of society through an individual’s improvement. Specifically, however, there are key differences between the two. York Rites consist of three separate and autonomous bodies, including the Chapter, Council and Commandery. Meanwhile, Scottish Rites have four coordinate bodies, including the Lodge of Perfection, the Council of Kadosh, Consistory, and the Chapter of Rose Croix.

Even the attire worn by Scottish and York Rites are different. The uniforms worn by the York Rite Commandery are complete with ceremonial swords, while Scottish Rite attires consist of an ornamented hat, which has the symbolic braiding of a double-headed eagle in a gold color. Finally, Scottish Rites have a hierarchical polity, while York Rites have a democratic polity.

Summary:

1. Scottish Rites refer to the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite conferred to Freemasonry members in the United States; while York Rites refer to a collection of Masonic degrees conferred separately in the city of York, where the first meetings of the Masons in England took place.

2. Scottish Rites have four coordinate bodies, while York Rites have three separate autonomous bodies.

3. Scottish Rites have a hierarchical polity, while York Rites have a democratic polity.


Search DifferenceBetween.net :

Custom Search



1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...


Email This Post Email This Post : If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.



See more about : ,

2 Comments

  1. The primary difference between these two Rites of Freemasonry is one of origin and tradition. The Scottish Rite describes a comprehensive series of degrees that represent a Masonic tradition that was developed in the French or continental tradition during the Age of Enlightenment. As a result, the degrees of the Scottish Rite are much more deeply developed and philosophical. On the other hand, the York Rite (or American Rite) describes a series of degrees that were developed in England and the United States, and teach lessons that are much more mundane in their presentation and interpretation. The York Rite is named for the city of York, because of the legend that King Athelstan called a convention of Masons at York during the 9th century. But, this legend is pure fiction. The Scottish Rite is so-named because the earliest degree of that particular tradition was the degree of Scottish Master, which was believed to have originated in Scotland, and was introduced into France during the mid-18th century, thus sparking a proliferation of Ecossais (Scottish) degrees.

  2. By the way, the terms “Scottish Rite” and “York Rite” are singular, not plural, as it is incorrectly written in this article.

    Further, this article states that the degrees of the Scottish Rite are “conferred to Freemasonry members in the United States.” This is only partly accurate, as the degrees of the Scottish Rite are only conferred on members of the Scottish Rite, and they are conferred on members in many countries around the world wherever the Scottish Rite may exist. It is not an American institution, but an international one.

    Also, the Scottish Rite has more than four bodies. It has five bodies, the last being the Supreme Council, which confers the Thirty-third and last degree of the Rite. It actually has six bodies, if you include the craft lodge (1st, 2nd, and 3rd degrees), and there are Scottish Rite craft lodges.

    By the same token, the York Rite (or American Rite) has more than three bodies, as it also includes the craft lodges of the York Rite, and the York Rite College, which confers the degree of Knight of York.

    Further, each of the degrees of the Scottish Rite has its own traditional regalia, many of which also include a ceremonial sword, although these are normally only worn by the ceremonial teams during conferrals.

    In regards to the Scottish Rite cap, only the cap of the 32nd Degree has the double-headed eagle. There are other Scottish Rite caps that do not have that insignia.

Leave a Response

Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.


Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Finder