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Difference Between SSRIs and MAOIs

SSRIs vs MAOIs

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, or commonly known as SSRIs, come from the same class of drugs with Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors, or commonly known as MAOIs. These two drugs are both antidepressants. Although the two drugs come from the same class of drug, they have major differences when it comes to their mechanism of action, side effects, drug interactions, etc. This article will enlighten you why physicians prescribe one drug as opposed to the other.

The most noteworthy antidepressant class available in the market these recent years is the SSRIs or Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. There are six available SSRIs in the market, such as: Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil, Luvox, Prozac, and Lexapro. The main purposes of these drugs are to manage bipolar and unipolar major depressive disorders and all disorders involving anxiety conditions. Nevertheless, inhibited trials as well support the utilization of SSRIs in the management of other psychiatric conditions including premenstrual dysphoria, dysthymia, borderline personality disorder, bulimia nervosa, rheumatic pain, migraine headache, and alcoholism. This medication is the first rationally made psychiatric drug. The approach behind the development of this type of rational drug is to devise an innovative medication that is competent of affecting a particular neural spot of action while evading the effects on other action sites. The purpose of such innovation is to create agents that are more safe and efficacious than other drugs.

On the other hand, Monoamine Oxidase is a particular enzyme that is established in various parts of the body. Inside the brain tissues, Monoamine Oxidase annihilates neurotransmitters like Serotonin and Norepinephrine. MAOIs are used to limit the action of Monoamine Oxidase. They block its breakdown. These inhibitors may work more rapidly than TCAs or tricyclic antidepressants although they have more serious side effects and necessitate a change in the person’s diet. The leading Monoamine Oxidase inhibitors are: Nardil, Parnate, Marplan, and Eldepryl. These medications are prescribed for patients who don’t act in response to SSRIs or TCAs for conditions of atypical depression, and for the reason that these drugs are relatively stimulating as opposed to being a sedative. This medication can be preferably used for managing dysthymia than tricyclics.

SSRIs are regarded as the first-line drug for depression. Physicians usually prescribe these drugs more frequently for elderly patients than other antidepressants. This drug is not a controlled medication. Among these types of drugs there are more similarities than disparities. Even though each and every one of these drugs have an identical mechanism of action, each drug has vaguely diverse pharmacokinetics and pharmacological characteristics.

In contrast with the aforementioned antidepressant, an MAOI is the least prescribed drug because of its dietary restrictions. People taking MAOIs may experience a hypertensive crisis much worse than the usual episode when they eat tyramine rich foods such as aged cheese, beer, red wine, yeast extracts, fermented foods, avocados, bananas, and even soy sauce. The side effects of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors are tachycardia or rapid heart rate, dizziness, food interactions, and sexual reticence. MAOIs can’t be given simultaneously with other particular medications because severe interactions may take place. When this drug is taken with a TCA, the patient may experience Noradrenergic Syndrome or usually called a hypertensive crisis. Moreover, when the MAOI is taken with SSRIs, Serotonin Syndrome or hyperpyrexic crisis will occur. A washout period of 14 days is necessary for these patients.

Summary:

1.Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, or commonly known as SSRIs, come from the same class of drugs with Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors, or commonly known as MAOIs.

2.The most noteworthy antidepressant class available in the market these recent years is the SSRIs or Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. MAOIs are used to limit the action of Monoamine Oxidase. They block its breakdown. These inhibitors may work more rapidly than TCAs or tricyclic antidepressants.

3.There are six available SSRIs in the market, such as Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil, Luvox, Prozac, and Lexapro. The leading Monoamine Oxidase inhibitors are: Nardil, Parnate, Marplan, and Eldepryl.

4.SSRIs are regarded as the first-line drug for depression. Physicians usually prescribe these drugs more frequently for elderly patients than other antidepressants. In contrast with the aforementioned antidepressant, an MAOI is the least prescribed drug because of its dietary restrictions.

5.Moreover, when the MAOI is taken with SSRIs, Serotonin Syndrome or hyperpyrexic crisis will occur. A washout period of 14 days is necessary for these patients.


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