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Difference Between ACP and S&W

ACP vs S&W

If you are thinking of purchasing a useful weapon for self-defense purposes, it can be quite a harrowing task to arrive at a suitable decision especially if you have never purchased a product like this before. It is imperative to read all possible resources on the net regarding the features of each weapon so that you end up making a worthwhile investment that is in accordance with your needs. One should know the differences between a .45 ACP and an S&W in such a case. There are definite points of distinction between these pistol models that can make a big difference in a life and death situation. So, you must choose carefully keeping in mind the kind of situations and circumstances you are exposed to. It also depends upon whether you need these weapons for a professional task or only for defensive purposes at home.

The Smith and Wesson pistols belong to the most prestigious pistol company in the United States of America. This company has been in business for around two decades already. However, the .45 ACP pistol is also quite an old model and these pistols are quite popular among a majority of the population as they have proven their mettle, time and again over the span of a few generations. This pistol was brought to the market for sale around a century ago making it the more trusted model of the two.

The S&W differs from the ACP significantly in terms of size and measurements. The S&W is quite compact when compared to a .45 ACP that is relatively larger and heavier. The diameter of the bullets that go into an S&W pistol is smaller than that of the bullets that are used in an ACP pistol. This point of difference is a considerable fact that makes a lot of people opt for an ACP. The bullets from an S&W,however, travel at faster velocities than those that leave an ACP and this point should not be ignored while taking the final decision.

Summary:

1) There is a more degree of recoil observed in an S&W than in an ACP pistol. The recoil in an ACP is not as abrupt and overpowering as in an S&W.

2) S&W pistols are preferred by those who want to avoid detection of their weapons as these pistols are smaller in size and can be stored easily even while traveling. An ACP pistol is quite large and easily visible.

3) The bullets that go into an ACP are larger than those that go into an S&W.

4) ACP has been in existence for a much longer time than an S&W pistol.

5) The velocity of bullets in an ACP is slower than the velocity observed in an S&W


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2 Comments

  1. The title (“Difference Between ACP and S&W”) suggests (or at least the reader would most reasonably infer) that the article is going to explain these two common suffixes found on many different handgun cartridges widely commercially available (at least in the United States, if not elsewhere).

    It then goes on to talk about the .45 ACP (which is a specific cartridge that a number of different guns are chambered for) as though it’s a type of gun, and compares it to a S&W, as if Smith & Wesson makes only one kind of gun (they many a great number of them, many of them in .45 ACP, even.)

    Also, the company Smith & Wesson was around and manufacturing arms decades (nearly half a century, in fact) before ANY “Automatic Colt Pistol.”

    This is simply an awful (read: offal) article in every possible respect.

  2. I have to agree with the last comment. The article tells nothing of value, and could easily confuse a novice.

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