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Difference Between Pyrimidine and Purine

Pyrimidine vs Purine

In biochemistry, different amino acids have important functions in the body and in other forms of chemicals. These amino acids have vital roles in the metabolism of food, energy, and so on and so forth. It is a complex and complicated topic which chemists and biochemists solely understand and are familiar with.

Two of the most important amino acids are pyrimidine and purine. The synthesis or combination of these two amino acids have a prime importance. However, before knowing the importance, let us tackle first the differences between the two amino acids.

Purines and pyrimidines are classified as the two kinds of nitrogen-containing bases. To differentiate their bases, Pyrimidines have a six-member nitrogen-containing ring while purine consists of five-membered plus six-membered nitrogen-containing rings that are stuck together.

Examples of purines are: adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine while examples of pyrimidines are: uracil, thymine, cytosine, and orotic acid.

Now, these two amino acids are important due for the following reasons. First, purines and pyrimidines are also sources of energy. It is not only ATP that is the source of energy but also purines and pyrimidines. These amino acids help drive the reaction of GTP which is helpful in protein synthesis. It also drives the reaction of UTP for glucose and galactose activation.

Another main difference between the two is that purine catabolism or breakdown in man is uric acid. Pyrimidine catabolism, or breakdown of pyrimidine in man on the other hand, is ammonia, carbon dioxide, and beta-amino acids. High amounts of purine in food can be found in wine, red meat, cheese, and vegetables. Thus, for people with gout, such foods should be avoided since uric acid will increase once these foods are eaten. Ammonia, on the other hand, should be avoided by those who have liver disease and mostly with end-stage liver disease as this causes hepatic encephalopathy.

Summary:

1.Pyrimidines have a six-member nitrogen-containing ring while purine consists of five-membered plus six-membered nitrogen-containing rings that are stuck together.
2.Examples of purines are: adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine while examples of pyrimidines are: uracil, thymine, cytosine, and orotic acid.
3.Another main difference between the two is that purine catabolism or breakdown in man is uric acid. Pyrimidine catabolism, or breakdown of pyrimidine in man on the other hand, is ammonia, carbon dioxide, and beta-amino acids.
4.Purines and pyrimidines are also sources of energy.


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