Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Differences Between Cocoons And Chrysalises

Cocoons vs Chrysalises

Moths and butterflies are two of the most interesting creature here on earth. One possible reason why a lot of people are attracted to them is because of their uniqueness. Both the moth and the butterfly undergo four distinct stages of life in the process called metamorphosis. These stages include the embryo, larva, pupa, and imago phases. Now, when studying these stages, a person might be confused with different terms such as chrysalis and cocoon. The chrysalis and the cocoon are both important in the life cycle of moths and butterflies. Read on below to fully grasp the differences between these terms:

Chrysalis and Cocoon

Basically, chrysalis is term used instead of pupa when talking about the third stage of the metamorphosis cycle, which is the ‘pupa stage.’ Having a similar meaning, the pupa or chrysalis stage is the transformation stage of a butterfly or a moth from larva to adult or to the imago stage. “Pupa” can be used for the naked stage for either the moth or the butterfly. However, “chrysalis” is stringently used only for the pupa of a butterfly.

On the other hand, a cocoon is a protective hard protein covering that guards the pupa or the chrysalis. Cocoon is made of silk, which is woven by the moth caterpillar, spinning the silk around it before it finally transform to a pupa. The moth will then attach its cocoon to a stem, a leaf or any possibly safe surface by making a complex yet strong web of silk threads that is formed in a pattern similar to that of Velcro. Cocoons are essential for moths to protect themselves from predators, especially when they already become a chrysalis or a pupa. This is because they became immobile after the transformation. Without the presence of cocoons, chrysalis and moth pupae would be very much susceptible and defenseless to many forms of predation.

Moth Cocoons or Chrysalis Cocoons?

How can one determine if a moth pupae or a chrysalis is inside the cocoon? Actually, the cocoons for moth are brownish or graying, and in general darker in color. There are some moths that include feces, dirt, small twigs or leaves into their cocoon so that it will be camouflage with nature, thus protecting themselves from the danger of a predator. On the other hand, the cocoons of chrysalises are usually golden in color combined with a metallic appearance.

To be able to enjoy the beauty and wonders of these beautiful flying creatures, landscaping an area for a garden will do. Spring time and summer time are the perfect moments for butterfly lovers to plant a butterfly garden, By doing this, you will does not only provide a beautiful location for a chrysalis to transform into a marvelous butterfly, but a butterfly garden can also offer them the perfect shelter, ample food, and perfect breeding areas for new generations of their species. Having a butterfly garden will not only make for a better and much beautiful house but it will also be beneficial in creating a balance of nature, as well as providing a safe home for uniquely interesting butterflies and moths.

Summary:

Basically, “chrysalis” is a term used instead of pupa when talking about the third stage of the metamorphosis cycle, which is the ‘pupa stage.’ On the other hand, a cocoon is a protective hard protein covering that guards the pupa or the chrysalis.

Having a similar meaning, the pupa or chrysalis is the transformation stage of a butterfly or a moth from larva to adult or to the imago stage.

A cocoon is made of silk that is woven by the moth caterpillar, who spins the silk around it before it finally transform to a pupa.


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