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Differences between Android Emulator and Simulator

Differences Between Android Emulator And Simulator

The word ‘Android’ is just running along with the life of almost each one of us somehow or the other. But most of us not aware of what an Android is, and the other associated technological terms. I know that it’s not required for a common human being like you and me! Just imagine the situation when you knew about what you use, what you talk, and what you recommend to others. I hope it would be amazing and even if could not help you understand everything or technology you use, here I could explain you the differences between Android Emulator and Simulator.

What is an Android?

We use the term ‘Android’ to denote a variety of products such as the mobile phones, Android Watches, other Android devices, and even the Android operating system. It has become a common word in our dictionary nowadays but there are lots to know about it apart from just the device, the Android mobile phones!

Let us start with the Android operating system as it is the essential component for any Android device. Android is a mobile operating system developed by the Google, so that w can experience the touch screen on our mobile devices such as Smartphone, Tablets, etc. The Google used the Linux Kernel in its making and even the manufacturer could never have been imagined its good reach among the public! The usability along with exciting features such as virtual keyboards, one-stop solution for a variety of our needs, etc has made it one of the preferred choices.

Not only Google the usage of stopped of Android in mobile phones but the list extends to digital cameras, game consoles, notebooks, as Android Auto in cars, as Android Wear in wrist watches, etc.

Mobile Testing

Both the terms Emulator and Simulator are related to the testing world and, especially, in mobile testing. The testing is carried out in every product manufacturing company as part of ensuring its features before being delivered to the public. The testing procedures or test cases actually verify that every feature is working aptly without any flaws. Even if there exist any flaws, the team would fix it before it goes to the public.

In such a testing, the team uses a virtual environment i.e. n imitation of the actual device. Here it can either an Android mobile phone, Android watch, Android Tablet, etc. So the testing team is not going to test with the actual device but with a similar kind of environment.

What is an Android Emulator?

As we have discussed earlier in this article, the manufacturer could not make a product before it has been tested thoroughly. Such an exhaustive testing requires an imitation of the product features in somehow or the other. The imitation in terms of both the hardware and the software is called as the Emulator. The Emulator could test the source code as well as the associated hardware parts. We can even say that an Emulator could verify the product’s correctness in every possible aspect.

What is a Simulator?

It is an imitation of only the software and helps in verifying the correctness of the source code in every possible aspect. It is not going to test the hardware by any mean but it means a lot when the functionalities of the product are put to test. You can just install it like any App you install on your computer or mobile phone.

Why Android Emulator or Simulator is required?

Below is a sample picture or the interface of An Android Emulator or Simulator and you would get a better idea of what it is by seeing it.

Differences Between Android Emulator And Simulator

Just imagine the situation when your product’s launch date was already fixed and you are responsible for testing all of its functionalities before it goes to the hands of the public. At this scenario, developing the product and carrying out the required testing after that would push you to miss the deadline. Rather, you could simply emulate or simulate the test environment to test the respective functionalities. This not only saves your time & money but also guarantees you a better product even at the first time. Hope you could understand the importance of the Android Emulators and Simulators before we go ahead with their differences.

Difference between Android Emulator & Simulator

  • What it tests?

The Android Emulator tests both the hardware and the software whereas the Android Simulator tests only the software. It means you can test the associated parts of the product as well by using an Emulator. But it is not possible with a simulator. You could simply create test cases for the source code related issues and could fix them before the making the product.

  • When an Emulator or a Simulator is preferable?

Whenever the Android device’s external behaviors need a testing, we require a Simulator. For example, we can use an emulator to do mathematical computations, execution of step-by-step transactions, etc. They could be handled with the source code and we are not bothered about the hardware.

At the same time, when we need to test the Android device’s internal behavior such as to verify the operation of a hardware part, firmware, etc, we prefer an emulator. The terms might be slightly confusing as ‘external’ I s being used for the simulator and the term ‘internal’ is being used for the emulator. When you read it the second time, you would get a clear idea.

  • In what Language they are written?

We are well-known that any Android device is composed of the Android Operating System (OS) and it obviously requires some source code. Well, the Emulator needs an interaction with the hardware parts of the Android device and therefore, it has to be written in the Machine Language i.e. using zeros and ones. It is often referred as the Assembly Language. But when it comes to the simulator, we are not bothered about the hardware here. So, it could be written in any of the preferable High-Level Languages.

  • The Debugging Process:

Imagine a situation that you are testing an Android mobile device with an emulator. Whenever you are stuck at a point or if you find an error in the device, then you need to trace back not only the source code but also the associated machine language code of the respective hardware. Only then, you could fix it and could ensure the correctness of the system. This looks easier as you are exposed to both the code right now. But in the case of a simulator, you just need to work on the high-level machine language code. It might sound easier but for your surprise it comparatively a tougher job. Do you why? Here we go! When you are stuck a point here, you could debug just the source code of the software. But when the problem is related to the hardware, it requires a further investigation and you do not have the option in a simulator.

  • Partial or Complete?

We can consider the Android simulator as a partial implementation of the original device as we miss the hardware testing here. But the Android emulator is a complete implementation of the original device as it includes both the hardware and the software.

Hope, you have got a better idea about these two elements i.e. the Android Emulator and the Android Simulator. Let us not move to the same context but in a different outline. Yes, below is the tabular representation of what we have discussed above.

S.No Differences in Android Emulator Android Simulator
1. What is it? The imitation in terms of both the hardware and the software is called as the Emulator. It is an imitation of only the software.
2. What it does or tests? The Emulator could test the source code as well as the associated hardware parts. We can even say that an Emulator could verify the product’s correctness in every possible aspect.

 

It helps in verifying the correctness of the source code in every possible aspect.
3. When is it preferable? When we need to test the Android device’s internal behavior such as to verify the operation of a hardware part, firmware, etc, we prefer an emulator. Whenever the Android device’s external behaviors need a testing, we require a Simulator. For example, we can use an emulator to do mathematical computations, execution of step-by-step transactions, etc.
4. Language used Emulator needs an interaction with the hardware parts of the Android device and therefore, it has to be written in the Machine Language i.e. using zeros and ones. It is often referred as the Assembly Language. We are not bothered about the hardware here. So, it could be written in any of the preferable High-Level Languages.

 

5. The Debugging Process Debugging could be done on the high-level as well as the machine language as we are exposed to both these here. Hence, debugging is easier. Debugging could be done only on the high-level language source code. We could not trace back the machine language even if it is required. Hence debugging is comparatively tougher.
6. Implementation It is a complete implementation of the original device. It is a partial implementation of the original device.

Please feel free to report few more differences, if we had missed any.


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References :


[0]https://www.test2break.in/difference-between-emulator-and-simulator/

[1]https://www.android.com/

[2]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_(operating_system)

[3]https://www.guru99.com/real-device-vs-emulator-testing-ultimate-showdown.html

[4]https://www.tutorialspoint.com/mobile_testing/mobile_testing_emulator_simulator.htm

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