Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Differences Between Nauseated and Nauseous

Nauseated vs Nauseous

Nausea by itself is a phenomenon of wanting to vomit. It is a discomfort or uneasiness in the upper stomach and thus, creates a feeling of the urge to vomit. However, not all people who have nausea actually vomit, but most often than not, they do. Nausea is actually an act mostly felt with discomforts of traveling. In fact, the Greek term “nautia,” from where it is derived, is a term that means “motion sickness,” which is the most common cause of nausea. It does not automatically precede that nausea can only be felt by traveling people, but it is also a symptom to some of the diseases or even when a person is bearing a child. It is known as a non-specific symptom because it has many possible causes. Even the different psychological disorders often have nausea in the symptoms list.

You might have had heard of the terms ‘nauseated’ and ‘nauseous’ before, but you can barely tell the difference. These are just the terms that goes with nausea as a verb itself, and it therefore has different meanings.

The difference between the two

We all have had encountered that English term on which we cannot really tell the difference. People often say “I feel nauseous” when in fact it should be ‘nauseated.’ These two terms are just some of the many English words that people often get confused about. The main difference of the two is the form of form of word. Nauseated is actually a verb. It is the act of feeling nauseated or, as mentioned, wanting to vomit. Therefore, when you actually feel as if you are feeling discomfort in your stomach, it is not right to use the term ‘nauseous’ but rather, ‘nauseated.’

On the other note, nauseous is an adjective that defines the different external or maybe internal factors that cause you to feel discomfort or nauseated. Like for example the motion of a moving vehicle, or the smell of certain garbage. According to the Merriam’s dictionary, this term is synonymous with something being nauseating.

This generation changes everything!

Although the definitions of the terms seem to be clear, the dictionary still has to go with whatever common terms the people are actually using. This is the reason why most terms that are not in the dictionary but are conventional are added up in the dictionary at the first place. As of these days, the mentioned terms are more likely officially interchanged.

The dictionary might have had official terms for it, but it is still obliged to go with what the people understand the terms to be. Thus, this just goes to show that nauseous and nauseated are both accepted as a verb as most people say “I feel nauseous” rather than nauseated. Hence, there are still people who actually know the difference of the two.

These are just two of the many English terms that most people confuse from another. Thus, the total orientation and awareness of it can indeed help in making the English words and grammar right in every sentence you say.

Summary:

Nauseated is actually a verb. It is the act of feeling nauseated or as mentioned, wanting to vomit. Therefore, when you actually feel as if you are feeling discomfort in your stomach, it is not right to use the term ‘nauseous’ but rather, ‘nauseated’.

On the other note, nauseous is an adjective that defines the different external or maybe internal factors that cause you to feel discomfort or nauseated. Like for example the motion of a moving vehicle, or the smell of certain garbage. According to the Merriam’s dictionary, this term is synonymous with nauseating.


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