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Difference Between Byzantine and Roman Catholic

byzantineByzantine vs Roman Catholic

When we speak of ‘Byzantine’, we are struck by the Byzantine Empire, or the Eastern Roman Empire with its capital based in Constantinople. In the early days, it was referred to as the Roman Empire and sometimes as Romania. The Byzantine had close connections with the Roman Empire, and hence modern day scholars believed that it formed the basis of the latter. In fact, the Byzantine can be related to pagan or Orthodox Church practices, whereas Roman Catholicism refers strictly to Christian practices. Generally, the faith of Christian groups acknowledges the Nicene Creed, which is a part of the apostolic and catholic church.

The Roman Catholic Church is headed by the papal authority in Rome. The Byzantine church practices philosophy and science to explain their faith. One of the primary areas of disagreement between the Byzantine and Roman Catholic practices is that the former does not disregard the intellect and its accomplishments. They follow the idea of the Word or logos, which Roman Catholics interpret as their God. To the Byzantine church however, logos is nothing but a principle, the basis of humanity. The concept of Providence is important in Byzantine thought, while Roman Catholicism looks upon it as the foundation stone for reason (the 13th century theologian Thomas Aquinas related Christian philosophy to Aristotle’s theories).

Byzantine scholars attribute their thoughts to external changes like clergy, monasticism, ecumenicalism and others, while Roman Catholic advocates an evolving theology which according to them served by enhancing the canons of their faith. The Roman Catholic God is very different from the harsh and exacting God of the Old Testament. He is a benevolent father who bestows his essence on us through infinite grace. The Roman Catholic God is an epitome of compassion.

The Roman Catholic Latin priests keep changing their canons, which are subsequently discarded with the passage of time. Byzantine thinkers follow them as ultimate.

Summary:
1. The Byzantine Empire was in function prior to Roman Catholicism
2. It has Hellenistic traditions and incorporations, unlike the Roman Catholic Church which is strictly Christian
3. Roman Catholic teachings propound that Christ gave Himself up on the Cross to redeem the first betrayal of Adam; Byzantine belief has it that Christ did it for ransoming the Devil
4. Byzantine religion is more liberal than Roman Catholicism
5. Byzantine ecclesiastical thought considers all clergymen as equals, which is not the case in Roman Catholicism which vests the bishopric responsibilities of the Catholic Church on the Pope


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2 Comments

  1. Where did you get this information? I am part of a byzantine catholic church and we do and say the same as roman catholic.

    Everything you said is wrong.

  2. I agree with Mary. This article gives entirely wrong information.

    It has Hellenistic traditions and incorporations, unlike the Roman Catholic Church which is strictly Christian—THIS IS NONSENSE! BYZANTINE CATHOLICS ARE STRICTLY CHRISTIAN ALSO.

    Roman Catholic teachings propound that Christ gave Himself up on the Cross to redeem the first betrayal of Adam; Byzantine belief has it that Christ did it for ransoming the Devil —RIDICULOUS COMMENT!

    Byzantine religion is more liberal than Roman Catholicism
    IN WHAT POSSIBLE WAY? NO EVIDENCE WHATSOEVER.

    Byzantine ecclesiastical thought considers all clergymen as equals, which is not the case in Roman Catholicism which vests the bishopric responsibilities of the Catholic Church on the Pope —BALDERDASH! BYZANTINE CATHOLICS HOLD THE ROMAN PONTIFF AS AS THE SUPREME AUTHORITY AND HEAD OF THE CHURCH.

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    Papal and Episcopal Documents (SEARCH THEM FOR YOURSELF)

    Orientale Lumen The Light of the East- John Paul II

    Church Venerates Fathers of East and West – John Paul II

    Decree on the Catholic Churches of the Eastern Rite – Orientalium Ecclesiarum Promulgated by His Holiness, Pope Paul VI on November 21, 1964

    Eastern theology has enriched the whole Church -Pope John Paul II

    Joint Patriarchal Statement – Assyrian Church of the East and Chaldean Catholic Church

    Apostolic Letter of Pope John Paul II on the 350th Anniversary of the Union of Uzhorod

    Unity in Diversity Archbishop Theodore E. McCarrick – From The Catholic Advocate, 17 August 1988

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