Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects

Difference Between Citrucel and Metamucil

Constipation is a common digestion-related problem which is viewed mainly as a condition seen in elderly patients, but it affects people of all age groups too. Elderly patients often complain of constipation when their stools become hard and difficult to pass. Infants and children also complain of irregularities in their bowel movement. Although constipation can affect people of all age groups, studies suggest an increase in incidence with age, especially after 65. People usually refer to one or more of the following symptoms that may or may not indicate constipation: infrequent stools, straining while passing stools, stools become hard, a lack of urgency to evacuate, and pain when trying to defecate. It is believed that patients who are low in dietary fiber may be prone to constipation. Now talking about treatment, bulk-forming laxatives are great over the counter fiber replacement products that are used to treat constipation if home remedies do not work. Two of the most common fiber supplements are Citrucel and Metamucil.

What is Citrucel?

Citrucel is a clinically proven bulk producing fiber laxative used to gently help relieve constipation and irregularity in the bowel movement. The lack of fiber in the diet is a major cause of constipation in developed countries. Bulk laxatives such as Citrucel replace this missing fiber and unlike other laxatives, they can be used for prolong periods of time without any side effects. Citrucel helps increase the amount of water in your stools, forming a gel that promotes healthy bowel movements without unwanted side effects like excess gas. Citrucel contains Methylcellulose, a chemical compound derived from cellulose and a gelling agent that increases the amount of water in stool making it softer and easier to pass. Citrucel is available in orange mix and sugar-free orange mix powders and talking about dosage, one teaspoonful of the powder should be taken with at least 8 ounces of water of other fluids at the first sign of irregularity, up to three times daily. It is also available in tablets form called Citrucel caplets.

What is Metamucil?

Metamucil is a natural soluble fiber supplement to treat constipation and irregularities in the bowel movement. Metamucil is the only leading brand to contain a 100 percent plant-based natural fiber called Psyllium Fiber, which is derived from the seeds of an herb called Plantago ovate grown mainly in India. It is a kind of bulk forming laxative that helps promote digestive health by maintaining and restoring regularity. Metamucil has as much soluble fiber as two bowls of oatmeal; in fact, many doctors recommend taking Metamucil as a fiber source on a regular basis. It contains that extra fiber that you may need to maintain regularity in your bowel movements safely and naturally. Metamucil comes in capsule, powder and liquid forms, and helps you maintain a healthy appetite. In addition, it is also a great fiber supplement solution for many things such as high cholesterol, blood sugar, and appetite control.

Difference between Citrucel and Metamucil

Active Ingredient

 – Both Citrucel and Metamucil are common bulk producing fiber laxatives that absorb liquid in the intestines to form a soft, bulky stool. The active ingredient in Citrucel is Methylcellulose, a chemical compound derived from cellulose and a gelling agent that increases the amount of water in stool making it softer and easier to pass. Metamucil is the only leading brand to contain a 100 percent plant-based natural fiber called Psyllium Fiber, which is derived from the seeds of an herb called Plantago ovate that is grown mainly in India.

Dosage 

– Citrucel is available in orange mix and sugar-free orange mix powders, and caplets. In regards to dosage, the instructions suggest that those aged 12 and above take one teaspoonful of the orange-flavored product or the sugar-free orange mix in 8 ounces of water or other fluids at the first sign of irregularity, up to three times daily. Each Citrucel caplet contains 500 mg of methylcellulose and those aged 12 and over are directed to take 2 caplets as needed with 8 ounces of water up to six times daily. Those aged 6 -12 take on-half of the adult dose.

Metamucil is a great fiber sources and comes in capsules, powders, powder packets, and fiber thin chocolates. Metamucil fiber powders are available in orange with real sugar and sugar-free, and unflavored with real sugar. Sugar free powders also come in orange zest, berry smooth, and original smooth variants. The standard dosage for the capsules is 2 to 5 per serving up to 4 times a day. As per directions, up to 2 teaspoonful of powder is to be taken with 8 ounces of water or other fluids up to three times daily. Mix in a full glass of water, stir and drink right away.

Citrucel vs. Metamucil: Comparison Chart

Summary

In a nutshell, both Citrucel and Metamucil are common bulk producing fiber laxatives that absorb liquid in the intestines to form a soft, bulky stool. Although, slightly different, both have essentially same health benefits, especially to relieve constipation. Citrucel, however, has no unwanted side effects like excess gas, which can be a problem for Metamucil because it contains Psyllium husk powder which can be gassier than other types of fiber. In addition, Metamucil is a great fiber supplement solution for many things such as high cholesterol, blood sugar, and appetite control.

Latest posts by Sagar Khillar (see all)

Search DifferenceBetween.net :

Custom Search


Help us improve. Rate this post! 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars
Loading...

Email This Post Email This Post : If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.


1 Comment

  1. My doctor recommended Citrucel only. I don’t if it’s in regards to ‘gas effect’ mentioned or not but I’ve tried to stay within his recommendation yet it’s been difficult to find lately.

Leave a Response

Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

References :


[0]Pray, Steven W. Nonprescription Product Therapeutics. Pennsylvania, United States: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006. Print

[1]Jones, Wes. Cure Constipation Now: A Doctor's Fiber Therapy to Cleanse and Heal. New York City, United States: Berkley Books, 2009. Print

[2]Image credit: https://static.openfoodfacts.org/images/products/003/700/074/1367/front_en.3.full.jpg

[3]Image credit: https://www.picclickimg.com/d/l400/pict/154051419443_/Citrucel-Caplets-Fiber-Therapy-for-Occasional-Constipation-Relief.jpg

Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.


See more about : ,
Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Finder