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Difference Between Cell and Tissue

Cell vs Tissue

In the late 16th century, an infamous scientist, Robert Hooke was studying a minute plant part through a provisional microscope and saw something at work. In his view, he was able to visualize cube-like structures which reminded him of the series of cells at a monastery. These were then called “the cells.” Complex as it may be, the human body begins as a single cell, the fertilized egg, which then multiplies roughly unceasingly. The resulting millions of cells become specialized according to their exact individual function. Several may become the muscles of the heart, others the cells of the skin, yet still others even the delicate lens of the eye. A group of particular cells working together for one purpose is then called a tissue. These two discovered microscopic structures have individual differences that make them unique in their own little ways in contributing functionality to the body.

One of the foremost differences of a cell and a tissue is obviously their size. Cells are microscopic in nature while the tissue is much larger because it comprises a number of cells. Commonly, a cell is something so minute that it becomes invisible to the unaided eye. But in the right circumstances, there are cells which are able to be seen of which,the largest is the nerve cell ranging up to 12 meters. Invisible to the naked eye as it may be, a single cell is composed of even tinier structures that work together to maintain their own operations. The cell is divided into subcellular units, namely: the cell membrane, cytoskeleton, genetic material, and organelles. Outside the cell membrane or the cell wall (for a plant’s cell), are structures such as the capsule, flagella, and fimbriae (pili). On the other hand, the tissue demonstrates structural differences brought about by both the cellular and even extracellular phenomena. A non-living matrix called the extracellular matrix (ECM) interlinks and separates cells within a tissue. Secreted by the cells, this extracellular matrix differs from one tissue to another in terms of composition. It may vary in its consistency from a solid like in a bone, to a semisolid like in a cartilage, or to even liquid like in blood.

Cells have two distinctive types: eukaryotic cell and prokaryotic cell. Prokaryotic cells are self-sufficient in nature while eukaryotic cells are cells of multicellular beings. On the contrary, a tissue has four known types: epithelial tissue, nerve tissue, muscle tissue, and connective tissue. In terms of developmental processes, cells undergo mitosis (cell division) or meiosis to replicate while tissues go through tissue repair or wound healing, taking place in two key manners by regeneration and by fibrosis. As for the function, a cell has three primary functions: growth and metabolism, creation, and protein synthesis. As mentioned, a tissue is an intermediate cellular hierarchy level between the cells and a total organism structure. Not essentially the same but from a similar source, a tissue is an assembly of cells that collectively carry out a definite purpose. Tissues are organized precisely in such a way they can be functional for a specific organ. All types of tissues may be present in most organs, but not a single type is unique for one organ.

Summary:

1.One of the foremost differences of a cell and a tissue is obviously their size. Cells are microscopic in nature while the tissue is much larger because it comprises a number of cells. Commonly, a cell is something so minute that it becomes invisible to the unaided eye.

2.In terms of structure, the cell is divided into subcellular units, namely: the cell membrane, cytoskeleton, genetic material, and organelles. Outside the cell membrane or the cell wall (for a plant’s cell), are structures such as the capsule, flagella and fimbriae (pili). On the other hand, the tissue demonstrates structural differences brought about by both the cellular and even extracellular phenomena.

3.Cells have two distinctive types: eukaryotic cell and prokaryotic cell. Prokaryotic cells are self-sufficient in nature while eukaryotic cells are cells of multicellular beings. On the contrary, a tissue has four known types: epithelial tissue, nerve tissue, muscle tissue, and connective tissue.

4.In terms of developmental processes, cells undergo mitosis (cell division) or meiosis to replicate while tissues go through tissue repair, or wound healing, taking place in two key manners by regeneration and by fibrosis.

5.As for the function, a cell has three primary functions: growth and metabolism, creation, and protein synthesis. As mentioned, a tissue is an intermediate cellular hierarchy level between the cells and a total organism structure. Not essentially the same but from the similar source, a tissue is an assembly of cells that collectively carry out a definite purpose.


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